OXFORD FIRST BOOK OF DINOSAURS

A big book of dinosaurs for young enthusiasts that’s most notable for colorful drawings of dinosaurs on every page. Arranging her information by topic, the author briefly discusses what a dinosaur is, how we know about them, how they lived, what the major groups are, concluding with possible reasons for their extinction. She explains that all dinosaurs had some things in common: they laid eggs with shells; they lived on land; and none could fly. But she makes no mention of the warm-blooded/cold-blooded controversy, nor does she mention that dinosaurs had scales. She describes familiar meat-eaters like Tyrannosaurus rex, giant plant-eaters like Brachiosaurus, armored dinosaurs like Ankylosaurous, horned ones like Triceratops, and the fierce small predators like Deinonychus. Cutaway drawings show the skeleton and internal organs of a plant-eater and the embryo in a dinosaur egg. Photo inserts show the serrated teeth of T. rex and bony neck frill of Triceratops. “Look Closer” inserts focus attention on interesting details. Size information is not given consistently, though the drawings in the section on size include a human for scale. Browsing through the pages, readers will sense that they’ve seen this all before, but budding dinosaur enthusiasts will still enjoy the arrangement. Added treats include a dinosaur quiz and some activities to do at home. (glossary, name pronunciation guide, index) (Nonfiction. 8-10)

Pub Date: Jan. 18, 2002

ISBN: 0-19-521847-7

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Oxford Univ.

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2001

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DINOSAUR BONE WAR

COPE AND MARSH’S FOSSIL FEUD

A straightforward chronological account of the lives, work and conflicts between O.C. Marsh and Edward Cope, pioneers in the newly developed field of paleontology, whose 19th-century feud led to countless discoveries, bitter bickering in scientific journals and destruction of some fossil specimens. The narrative does not dwell on details of their fieldwork; it is the drama of their escalating quarrel that carries the reader along, while the author occasionally adds a reminder that much more might have been accomplished with cooperation. Occasional black-and-white photographs and reproductions of their notes and drawings add interest. This latest entry in the long-standing Landmark history series will especially appeal to middle-grade readers grown beyond their first fascination with dinosaurs and ready to learn more about the scientists who opened up this field, sometimes literally. (index, bibliography) (Nonfiction. 8-10)

Pub Date: Dec. 26, 2006

ISBN: 0-375-81349-7

Page Count: 128

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2006

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DINOSAUR TROUBLE

Replacing his usual stock of farm animals with an older, more primitive cast, King-Smith pits families of Pterodactyls and Apatosaurs against a predatory T. rex. After ignoring the species prejudice of their parents to strike up a friendship, leather-winged newborn Nosy and hulking Banty (short for “Bantamweight,” which she is when compared to her mother and father) come up with a daring plan to drive toothy Hack the Ripper out of the area. Their intellectually pretentious Moms and dimwitted Dads are initially reluctant but eventually agree to pitch in—and it all works out even better than expected. In Bruel’s frequent cartoon scenes and vignettes, the players display a supple solidity as they smile, scowl or look confused according to their assigned roles. The unusual setting and mild suspense of this celebration of interspecies cooperation will draw in recent easy-reader graduates. The addition of multi-syllabic dinosaur names and Latinate vocabulary words add extra appeal. (Fantasy. 8-10)

Pub Date: March 1, 2008

ISBN: 978-1-59643-324-3

Page Count: 128

Publisher: Roaring Brook

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2008

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