The story of a divide that cannot be bridged will leave readers with much to ponder.

READ REVIEW

THE FOX WIFE

In this modern interpretation of a traditional Inuit story, a fox marries a human.

One day a beautiful red fox falls from the sky. Catching sight of an Inuit family, she is fascinated. When the older son, Irniq, spots her, she flees but follows them, out of sight. Years pass, and Irniq grows into a man. He decides to set out on his own. His mother worries, but his father reassures her that their son is capable of surviving the rugged terrain. Now Irniq has his own sealskin tent, and after a long day hunting, he must do the chores alone. But there is a surprise when he arrives back at his camp. Who has lit the oil lamp and prepared his fish? This tale of a supernatural fox who hangs up her skin to become an Inuit man’s wife will sadden readers who hope to find unconditional love at the heart of the story. Instead, the book teaches an important lesson about judging our loved ones. With illustrations extending across double-page spreads, the tundra feels as if it is expanding beyond the corners of the book. The northern lights bounce off the horizon to enhance the mystery of this world, inviting readers to imagine a distant place and time when animals could become human.

The story of a divide that cannot be bridged will leave readers with much to ponder. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: May 7, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-77227-212-3

Page Count: 30

Publisher: Inhabit Media

Review Posted Online: March 31, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2019

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

This ambitious introduction to an important concept tries too hard to pigeonhole people, places, and things

NOUNS SAY "WHAT'S THAT?"

From the Word Adventures: Parts of Speech series

Anthropomorphized representations of a person, a place, and a thing introduce readers to nouns.

The protagonists are Person, a green, hairy, Cousin Itt–looking blob; Place, a round, blue, globe-ish being (stereotypically implied female by eyelashes and round pigtails); and Thing, a pink cloud with limbs, a porkpie hat, and red glasses. They first introduce the word “noun” and then start pointing out the nouns that fall under each of their categories. In their speech balloons, these vocabulary words are set in type that corresponds to the speaker’s color: “Each wheel is a thing noun,” says Thing, and “wheel” is set in red. Readers join the three as they visit a museum, pointing out the nouns they see along the way and introducing proper and collective nouns and ways to make nouns plural. Confusingly, though, Person labels the “bus driver” a “person noun” on one page, but two spreads later, Thing says “Abdar is a guard. Mrs. Mooney is a ticket taker. Their jobs are things that are also nouns.” Similarly, a group of athletes is a person noun—“team”—but “flock” and “pack” are things. Lowen’s digital illustrations portray a huge variety of people who display many skin and hair colors, differing abilities, and even religious and/or cultural markers (though no one is overweight). Backmatter includes a summary of noun facts, a glossary, an index (not seen), critical-thinking questions, and a list of further reading. Books on seven other parts of speech release simultaneously.

This ambitious introduction to an important concept tries too hard to pigeonhole people, places, and things . (Informational picture book. 5-8)

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5158-4058-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Picture Window Books

Review Posted Online: May 12, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2019

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

For the dedicated nonfiction fan, this picture dictionary introduces media that are better experienced than described.

LITTLE LEONARDO'S FASCINATING WORLD OF THE ARTS

From the Little Leonardo's Fascinating World series

This entry in a series named for Leonardo da Vinci, an “original Renaissance man,” describes the many forms and functions of art in today’s world.

This colorful book shows very young children what art is and what different kinds of artists do. The author begins by listing several kinds of art as they appear in our lives, then describes historical art forms, such as cave painting and pottery design. Next, entire pages and spreads feature particular forms of art, artists, and materials, including sculpture, writing, drama, graphic design, architecture, and music. The role of computers in the creation of art today is mentioned, and readers are encouraged to imagine themselves as artists. The cartoon-style pictures show cheerful, ethnically diverse children in mainstream American settings creating art that often mirrors well-known pieces and styles of the Western tradition. A jazz band is included on the music page. An author’s note at the end of the book introduces six great artists of the past; three of these are women, but five of the six are white. While children throughout the book are representative of America’s diversity, readers will have to look elsewhere for inclusion of diverse contributions to the world of art. Volumes on math and science are similarly formulated but wordier. A page on anthropology in the science volume assumes a cultural perspective that all readers may not share.

For the dedicated nonfiction fan, this picture dictionary introduces media that are better experienced than described. (glossary, author’s note) (Nonfiction. 4-8)

Pub Date: March 13, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-4236-4873-4

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

Review Posted Online: Dec. 21, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2018

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more