This in-depth guide offers plenty to learn and do for adventurers of all skill and experience levels.

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THE YOUNG ADVENTURER'S GUIDE TO (ALMOST) EVERYTHING

BUILD A FORT, CAMP LIKE A CHAMP, POOP IN THE WOODS—45 ACTION-PACKED OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

Outdoor-adventure activities combine wisdom and fun in this practical guide to the wild.

Knowledge about the natural world and its resources used to be passed down from one generation to the next, as it was required for survival. Although modern society no longer requires familiarity with wild edibles, forecasting weather from clouds, and making a friction fire, these skills remain useful, say the authors of this handy guide. A thoughtful introduction acknowledges the Native American origins of many of the skills introduced in the book. Part 1, “Secrets of the Woods,” includes tapping a maple tree and navigating by the stars. Part 2 covers camping skills from tying knots to brushing your teeth with a stick. Part 3 offers instructions for making such useful items as a willow basket, a log raft, or a birch-bark knife sheath (there is a discussion of knife handling and safety). Part 4 shows readers how to make fun things from nature, like a whistle from a stick or a kite from turkey feathers (“ask a turkey hunter or look on eBay or Etsy”). The instructions are remarkably clear, and black-and-white illustrations add visual interest, levity, and clarity when needed. Fascinating enough to read cover to cover without setting foot outside, it will also be a reliable companion on camping and hiking trips to augment hours of outdoor exploring.

This in-depth guide offers plenty to learn and do for adventurers of all skill and experience levels. (Nonfiction. 11-17)

Pub Date: April 16, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-61180-594-9

Page Count: 208

Publisher: Roost Books/Shambhala

Review Posted Online: March 3, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2019

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A stimulating plunge for casual browsers and serious students alike.

ULTIMATE OCEANPEDIA

THE MOST COMPLETE OCEAN REFERENCE EVER

A compendium of all things oceanic, from surface to depths, covering biology, geology, coasts, climatic phenomena, and human use and abuse.

Considering the size of the general topic, the coverage isn’t as shallow as it might be. Hundreds of crisply professional nature photos and big, easy-to-follow charts and diagrams anchor waves of densely packed but often breezy commentary (“Many parrotfish species also make their own sleeping bags at night—out of mucus!”) that Wilsdon pours in beneath such headers as “It’s a Shore Thing” and “Belize It or Not!” Overviews of each ocean, of plate tectonics, the action and effects of ocean currents, worldwide climate change, and physical features from islands to abyssal plains sail by in succession, but marine biology takes pride of place with page after page of photogenic sea life from tiny krill on up to whales and polar bears. The author profiles a marine ecologist and interviews an oceanographer to cap chapters on modern research, exploration, and industries, then closes with generous lists of sites to visit physically or virtually.

A stimulating plunge for casual browsers and serious students alike. (glossary, index) (Nonfiction. 11-14)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4263-2550-2

Page Count: 272

Publisher: National Geographic Kids

Review Posted Online: Nov. 23, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2016

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DANCING WHEELS

A stereotype about people with disabilities is shattered by this introduction to a dance company known as Dancing Wheels, a group composed of “sit down” and “stand-up” dancers. The story begins with Mary Fletcher-Verdi, born with spina bifida, a condition that causes weakness in the legs and spine. Mary always wanted to dance, and, encouraged by a family who focused on what she could do rather than what she couldn’t, she studied the art and eventually formed a mixed company, some who dance on their legs, and some who dance in wheelchairs. What she accomplished can be seen in this photo journal of the group’s dance workshop in which beginners and experienced dancers study and rehearse. Along the way, McMahon (One Belfast Boy, 1999, etc.) intersperses the history of the group, some details about the dancers, their families, and the rehearsal process that leads up to the final performance. Three children are featured, Jenny a wheelchair dancer, Devin, her stand-up partner, and Sabatino, the young son of Mary’s partner. The focus on these youngsters gives the reader a sense of their personalities and their lives with their families. Godt’s (Listen for the Bus, not reviewed, etc.) color photographs detail every aspect of the story and show the dancers at home and in rehearsal, interacting with each other, having fun, and finally performaning. They convey the dancer’s sense of joy as well as the commitment to the dance as an art form felt by the adult directors and teachers. An excellent book for helping children and adults expand their understanding about the abilities of the “disabled.” (Nonfiction. 7-12)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2000

ISBN: 0-395-88889-1

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2000

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