MY LITTLE BLUE DRESS by Bruno Maddox

MY LITTLE BLUE DRESS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This lively and ingenious first novel by the former editor of Spy juxtaposes two very different stories: the history, told by “herself,” of a lusty young woman born on the first day of the last century, and the checkered love life and paraliterary career of “Bruno Maddox,” who’s writing the former tale at breakneck speed (and quite ineptly) to fulfill an unwisely entered contractual agreement. The metafictional stuff is frazzled and fragmented (though its cheerfully pessimistic tone is perversely enjoyable)—especially when compared with the unnamed fictional heroine’s progress, from her childhood in a rustic backwater (whose inhabitants speak a riotously unintelligible dialect) through affairs with lovers of both sexes, various misadventures in Europe and America, and the eventual uniting of her fate with her creator’s. The story is a mischievous updating of Terry Southern and Mason Hoffenberg’s semi-immortal jeu Candy, among other things (you might call it a parody of Nabokov parodying erotic commercial fiction).

It does go on a bit too long, but it’s a hoot all the same.

Pub Date: April 23rd, 2001
ISBN: 0-670-88483-9
Page count: 304pp
Publisher: Viking
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15th, 2001