LITTLE BUNNY'S SLEEPLESS NIGHT

PLB 0-7358-1070-2 A very minimal imaginative effort starring Little Bunny, identified as an only child (although there are no parents commented upon or seen) who is feeling a bit lonely as he tries to go to sleep. He hops off to Squirrel’s house; Squirrel readily invites him in, but proves to be a midnight snacker who makes too much noise with his acorns. Little Bunny tries Skunk’s house, but there is a minor accident of the aromatic kind, so Little Bunny moves on. At Porcupine’s a few errant quills send him packing; at Bear’s, the snoring can be registered on the Richter scale; at Owl’s, lights burn into the night as Owl feeds his keen intelligence. Owl’s words of wisdom: “Just go back home where you belong.” Little Bunny does, and falls asleep. Readers probably already know that there is no place like home, but the other messages—that friends are a bother, that it’s better to be lonely, that individual quirks cannot be accommodated—will be new. Gorbachev’s illustrations are great, colorful scene-setting tableaux, owing more than a nod to Richard Scarry. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: March 1, 1999

ISBN: 0-7358-1069-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: NorthSouth

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1999

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HOW MANY CANDLES?

PLB 0-688-16259-2 Time is relative, as Griffith’s pleasingly droll story makes clear, especially when a cat, a dog, a turtle, and a couple gnats get together to compare longevity. The dog, Alex, has made a cake for his friend, Robbie, a boy turning ten who never appears in these pages. A cat notes that Robbie’s years equal about 70 of hers, while a turtle figures that the same number equals about 8 of his years, because he can live to be 100. Two gnats buzz in to check on the doings, and they can’t even begin to comprehend the very notion of ten years—“ ‘Well, they’re gnats,’ said the cat. ‘Ten years to a boy is one billion years to a gnat.’ “ As Alex tries to determine how many candles are needed for each new configuration, the cat sniffs the cake: “This seems to be made of dog biscuits,” and the higher mathematics are put on the back burner while some sheer tomfoolery comes to the fore. This is a delightful exploration of dry humor and number-juggling, accompanied by some elegantly funny artwork. (Picture book. 5-7)

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 1999

ISBN: 0-688-16258-4

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Greenwillow

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1999

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WHERE IS THAT CAT?

PLB 0-7868-2399-2 Miss Perkins goes out in the snow to get her mail and brings back a stray cat. Naming it Fitz, because that is the sound it made when it sneezed, Miss Perkins tries not to get too attached to the stray, and runs an ad that reads: “Wanted: Good home for fluffy cat named Fitz.” Fitz, however, does not want to be adopted by anyone other than Miss Perkins, so he mysteriously disappears whenever someone answers the ad. Fitz finds his way into Miss Perkins’s heart by jumping up on her lap and licking the tip of her nose, sleeping at the foot of her bed to keep her feet warm, and finally chasing a mouse out of her home. With that final act, Miss Perkins finds Fitz to be a perfectly remarkable cat. Bright and finely detailed illustrations show clearly why the cat would not leave; the elderly woman’s home is as snug as they come in the detailed illustrations. Children will love this simple story of a love match forged by destiny, and aided by the occasional well-timed disappearance. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 1999

ISBN: 0-7868-0457-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Hyperion

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1999

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