HOLD FAST YOUR DREAMS

TWENTY COMMENCEMENT SPEECHES

A compilation of 20 college commencement speeches, some very recent (Florence Griffith Joyner in 1994, Ken Burns in 1993) and some relatively old (Dr. Seuss in 1977, Ralph Nader in 1981), arranged in alphabetical order by the speakers' last names. There are no common themes or revelations, just an unrelated group of speeches by a varied group of speakers, among them Colin Powell, Ben Cohen (of Ben & Jerry's), Cathy Guisewite, Carl Sagan, Marian Wright Edelman, Wilma Mankiller, Robert Fulghum, and Billy Joel. Many of the pieces are not very inspiring and some don't translate well from oratory to the printed page, as when Jimmy Carter tells his audience at Rice University, ``We make our living writing books. My wife's only request was to announce to you that our books are still on sale.'' The final selection is Gloria Steinem's, who says in her 1987 address, ``I conducted a small survey in preparation for today. Half of my sample could not remember who their commencement speaker was.'' Colen (Peas and Honey, not reviewed, 1995, etc.) and Boyko provide an introduction and brief biographies for each speaker. (b&w photos) (Anthology. 16+)

Pub Date: May 1, 1996

ISBN: 0-590-50956-X

Page Count: 230

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 1996

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A BUSY DAY AT THE GARAGE

A rural, pleasantly ramshackle garage is the setting for this lively book. Each spread features the station and its forecourt, with a flurry of activity accompanying each turn of the page: The garage opens up for the day; a bashed-in car arrives; a brief squall soaks a lady, her swain, and their tony convertible. Over it all presides Mr. Fingers, a harmlessly gangsterish type in striped trousers and white jacket. Dupasquier (Andy's Pirate Ship, 1994, etc.) keeps the text quick, simple, and hand-in-glove with the illustrations (``Mick and Mack start to work on Mr. Walker's car. Pete serves the first customer''). These watercolors are equally nimble, deliberately cartoonish in the linework and saturated colors. The front and rear flap covers fold out with an array of questions and puzzles pertaining to the story. Bright, boisterous, fun; for children who take to the format, there are two companion volumes: A Busy Day at the Airport (ISBN 1-56402-591-8) and A Busy Day at the Building Site (592-6). (Picture book. 4+)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 1996

ISBN: 1-56402-590-X

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 1995

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ART IN ACTION 1

INTRODUCING CHILDREN TO THE WORLD OF ART WITH 24 CREATIVE PROJECTS INSPIRED BY 12 MASTERPIECES

Pitamic bites off more than she can chew with this instructional art volume, but its core projects will excite in the right context. Twelve pieces of fine art inspire two art projects apiece. Matisse’s The Snail opens the Color section; after history and analysis, there’s one project arranging multicolored tissue-paper squares and one project adding hue to white paint to create stripes of value gradation. These creative endeavors exploring value, shade, texture and various media will exhilarate young artists—but only with at best semi-successful results, as they require an adult dedicated to both advance material procurement and doing the artwork along with the child. Otherwise, complex instructions plus a frequent requirement to draw or trace realistically will cause frustration. Much of the text is above children’s heads, errors of terminology and reproduction detract and the links between the famous pieces and the projects are imprecise. However, an involved adult and an enterprising child aged seven to ten will find many of the projects fabulously challenging and rewarding. Art In Action 2 (ISBN: 978-0-7641-441-7) publishes simultaneously. (artist biographies, glossary, location of originals) (Nonfiction. Adults)

 

Pub Date: July 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-7641-4440-0

Page Count: 96

Publisher: Barron's

Review Posted Online: May 23, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2010

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