Thin and inane.

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DISCORD’S APPLE

A fantasy novel that combines modern apocalypse (or close to it), Greek mythology and Roman domestic life…and doesn’t work on any level.

The apple of the title is The Apple, the one that started the Trojan War. It seems that it’s being kept in a basement storehouse in Hopes Fort, Colo., guarded by Frank Walker, whose health hasn’t been too good recently. Concerned about his decline, his daughter Evie comes to visit and can’t help but notice those strange people who show up to get things out of basement storage. What would they want with a sword, a glass slipper or 12-league boots? The scene shifts abruptly from Colorado to ancient Troy, in the final days of the Trojan War. Odysseus’s friend and cousin Sinon (aka The Liar) is inserted into the walled city and persuades the Trojans to accept the gift of the wooden horse, but just as the Greeks begin to celebrate their victory, Sinon is taken prisoner by Apollo, not at all happy with the way events turned out. Apollo forces Sinon to become his servant and cupbearer, and also watches voyeuristically when Sinon has sex with the local nymph. (And it’s also hard to imagine Apollo would really say to Sinon, “Make love to me, my Achaean warrior.”) Meanwhile, back in Colorado, Hera has shown up and is looking for the apple, for she wants to reintroduce even more discord into the world so it will destroy itself and begin anew. Evie’s mysterious companion Alex, who now and then mutters in Greek, turns out to be Sinon in modern dress. In fact, a parade of mythological characters makes their way to Colorado, including Merlin and Arthur, fighting on behalf of Evie, Robin Goodfellow, who’s relatively evanescent and wispy until Evie clubs him with a cast-iron frying pan, and the Wanderer, who years ago met Christ and found him a “good preacher.”

Thin and inane.

Pub Date: July 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-7653-2554-9

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Tor

Review Posted Online: June 3, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2010

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An almost-but-not-quite-great slavery novel.

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THE WATER DANCER

The celebrated author of Between the World and Me (2015) and We Were Eight Years in Power (2017) merges magic, adventure, and antebellum intrigue in his first novel.

In pre–Civil War Virginia, people who are white, whatever their degree of refinement, are considered “the Quality” while those who are black, whatever their degree of dignity, are regarded as “the Tasked.” Whether such euphemisms for slavery actually existed in the 19th century, they are evocatively deployed in this account of the Underground Railroad and one of its conductors: Hiram Walker, one of the Tasked who’s barely out of his teens when he’s recruited to help guide escapees from bondage in the South to freedom in the North. “Conduction” has more than one meaning for Hiram. It's also the name for a mysterious force that transports certain gifted individuals from one place to another by way of a blue light that lifts and carries them along or across bodies of water. Hiram knows he has this gift after it saves him from drowning in a carriage mishap that kills his master’s oafish son (who’s Hiram’s biological brother). Whatever the source of this power, it galvanizes Hiram to leave behind not only his chains, but also the two Tasked people he loves most: Thena, a truculent older woman who practically raised him as a surrogate mother, and Sophia, a vivacious young friend from childhood whose attempt to accompany Hiram on his escape is thwarted practically at the start when they’re caught and jailed by slave catchers. Hiram directly confronts the most pernicious abuses of slavery before he is once again conducted away from danger and into sanctuary with the Underground, whose members convey him to the freer, if funkier environs of Philadelphia, where he continues to test his power and prepare to return to Virginia to emancipate the women he left behind—and to confront the mysteries of his past. Coates’ imaginative spin on the Underground Railroad’s history is as audacious as Colson Whitehead’s, if less intensely realized. Coates’ narrative flourishes and magic-powered protagonist are reminiscent of his work on Marvel’s Black Panther superhero comic book, but even his most melodramatic effects are deepened by historical facts and contemporary urgency.

An almost-but-not-quite-great slavery novel.

Pub Date: Sept. 24, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-399-59059-7

Page Count: 432

Publisher: One World/Random House

Review Posted Online: July 1, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2019

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An ambitious and bewitching gem of a book with mystery and passion inscribed on every page.

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THE STARLESS SEA

A withdrawn graduate student embarks on an epic quest to restore balance to the world in this long-anticipated follow-up to The Night Circus (2011).

Zachary Ezra Rawlins is a typical millennial introvert; he likes video games, escapist reading, and drinking sidecars. But when he recognizes himself in the pages of a mysterious book from the university library, he's unnerved—and determined to uncover the truth. What begins as a journey for answers turns into something much bigger, and Zachary must decide whether to trust the handsome stranger he meets at a highflying literary fundraiser in New York or to retreat back to his thesis and forget the whole affair. In a high-wire feat of metatextual derring-do, Morgenstern weaves Zachary's adventure into a stunning array of linked fables, myths, and origin stories. There are pirates and weary travelers, painters who can see the future, lovers torn asunder, a menacing Owl King, and safe harbors for all the stories of the world, far below the Earth on the golden shores of a Starless Sea. Clocking in at more than 500 pages, the novel requires patience as Morgenstern puts all the pieces in place, but it is exquisitely pleasurable to watch the gears of this epic fantasy turn once they're set in motion. As in The Night Circus, Morgenstern is at her best when she imagines worlds and rooms and parties in vivid detail, right down to the ballroom stairs "festooned with lanterns and garlands of paper dipped in gold" or a cloak carved from ice with "ships and sailors and sea monsters...lost in the drifting snow." This novel is a love letter to readers as much as an invitation: Come and see how much magic is left in the world. Fans of Neil Gaiman and V.E. Schwab, Kelly Link and Susanna Clarke will want to heed the call.

An ambitious and bewitching gem of a book with mystery and passion inscribed on every page.

Pub Date: Nov. 5, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-385-54121-3

Page Count: 512

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: Aug. 4, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2019

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