Sure to have readers rooting for Zebra and laughing, too.

READ REVIEW

BONKERS

Can the animals at Sunset Safari Park save their home?

Pessimistic Penguin thinks nothing can save the doomed game preserve where he and a bevy of other animals live, since no one ever visits anymore. Zebra is more hopeful and rallies a flamingo, a lion, a giraffe, and various other creatures behind a cockamamie plan to grow “the biggest beets in the world.” Penguin thinks this idea is “bonkers,” but lo and behold—it works! Due in part to the copious amounts of manure the animals provide it, one particular beet grows to enormous proportions, attracting visitors by the hundreds. In fact, it grows so big that it crowds out the crowds. What will the animals do now? Zebra comes to the rescue again with a fork and a spoon and a mighty appetite. “Are you BONKERS?…You can’t eat all that,” says Penguin. But, in keeping with the story’s tall-tale feel, Zebra does eat the whole beet. In doing so, he transforms from a white-and-black striped animal to a purple-and-black one—and from a mere park resident to its new main attraction. People by the thousands visit, and the park is saved. Throughout, Jevons’ cartoon illustrations amplify the silly text’s humor with strong visual characterization and funny details.

Sure to have readers rooting for Zebra and laughing, too. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-84886-310-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Maverick Publishing

Review Posted Online: May 28, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2018

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Still, this young boy’s imagination is a powerful force for helping him deal with life, something that should be true for...

OLIVER AND HIS EGG

Oliver, of first-day-of-school alligator fame, is back, imagining adventures and still struggling to find balance between introversion and extroversion.

“When Oliver found his egg…” on the playground, mint-green backgrounds signifying Oliver’s flight into fancy slowly grow larger until they take up entire spreads; Oliver’s creature, white and dinosaurlike with orange polka dots, grows larger with them. Their adventures include sharing treats, sailing the seas and going into outer space. A classmate’s yell brings him back to reality, where readers see him sitting on top of a rock. Even considering Schmid’s scribbly style, readers can almost see the wheels turning in his head as he ponders the girl and whether or not to give up his solitary play. “But when Oliver found his rock… // Oliver imagined many adventures // with all his friends!” This last is on a double gatefold that opens to show the children enjoying the creature’s slippery curves. A final wordless spread depicts all the children sitting on rocks, expressions gleeful, wondering, waiting, hopeful. The illustrations, done in pastel pencil and digital color, again make masterful use of white space and page turns, although this tale is not nearly as funny or tongue-in-cheek as Oliver and His Alligator (2013), nor is its message as clear and immediately accessible to children.

Still, this young boy’s imagination is a powerful force for helping him deal with life, something that should be true for all children but sadly isn’t. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: July 1, 2014

ISBN: 978-1-4231-7573-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Disney-Hyperion

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2014

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Watching unlikely friends finally be as “happy as two someones can be” feels like being enveloped in your very own hug.

THE HUG

What to do when you’re a prickly animal hankering for a hug? Why, find another misfit animal also searching for an embrace!

Sweet but “tricky to hug” little Hedgehog is down in the dumps. Wandering the forest, Hedgehog begs different animals for hugs, but each rejects them. Readers will giggle at their panicked excuses—an evasive squirrel must suddenly count its three measly acorns; a magpie begins a drawn-out song—but will also be indignant on poor hedgehog’s behalf. Hedgehog has the appealingly pink-cheeked softness typical of Dunbar’s art, and the gentle watercolors are nonthreatening, though she also captures the animals’ genuine concern about being poked. A wise owl counsels the dejected hedgehog that while the prickles may frighten some, “there’s someone for everyone.” That’s when Hedgehog spots a similarly lonely tortoise, rejected due to its “very hard” shell but perfectly matched for a spiky new friend. They race toward each other until the glorious meeting, marked with swoony peach swirls and overjoyed grins. At this point, readers flip the book to hear the same gloomy tale from the tortoise’s perspective until it again culminates in that joyous hug, a book turn that’s made a pleasure with thick creamy paper and solid binding.

Watching unlikely friends finally be as “happy as two someones can be” feels like being enveloped in your very own hug. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: April 2, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-571-34875-6

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Faber & Faber

Review Posted Online: Jan. 15, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2019

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