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EVEN GREATER MISTAKES

STORIES

An essential Anders treasury.

Novelist Anders showcases the roots of her fiction with this wide-ranging set of short stories.

Although there are no stories original to this collection, there are plenty of delights for Anders' fans and those new to her writing, including the darkly frenetic, apocalyptic novella Rock Manning Goes for Broke (published as a stand-alone in 2018) and stories set in the worlds of her novels All the Birds in the Sky (2016) and The City in the Middle of the Night (2019). The mood of these works runs the gamut from the outrageously silly (the title “Fairy Werewolf vs. Vampire Zombie” tells you almost everything you need to know except for the climactic karaoke battle) to exuberant (unearthly beings fulfill a lonely trans girl’s wish in an unexpected and beautiful way in “The Visitmothers”) to mournful tinged with hope (“Rat Catcher’s Yellows” concerns an online adventure game providing an unusual outlet for people suffering from early-onset dementia) to depressed and angrily frustrated (“Ghost Champagne” features an aspiring comedian haunted by her own ghost) to utterly wrenching (a trans woman resists a puritanical corporation’s gruesomely invasive attempt to “fix” her in “Don’t Press Charges and I Won’t Sue,” which was also selected for The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2018). Anders also explores the relationships of (literally) out-of-sync couples, such as in the Hugo Award–winning novelette Six Months, Three Days, in which the two psychic participants have diametrically and tragically opposed ways of seeing the future, and “Power Couple,” in which two ambitious people believe cryonics will help them balance their personal and professional lives. Some stories seem to be sheer “what-if” exercises—always a fruitful jumping-off point for SF—but the fully developed characters who carry out these thought experiments prevent these tales from becoming clinical, as they might in the hands of other writers.

An essential Anders treasury.

Pub Date: Nov. 16, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-250-76650-2

Page Count: 352

Publisher: Tor

Review Posted Online: Oct. 12, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2021

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  • New York Times Bestseller

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DEVOLUTION

A tasty, if not always tasteful, tale of supernatural mayhem that fans of King and Crichton alike will enjoy.

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  • New York Times Bestseller

Are we not men? We are—well, ask Bigfoot, as Brooks does in this delightful yarn, following on his bestseller World War Z(2006).

A zombie apocalypse is one thing. A volcanic eruption is quite another, for, as the journalist who does a framing voice-over narration for Brooks’ latest puts it, when Mount Rainier popped its cork, “it was the psychological aspect, the hyperbole-fueled hysteria that had ended up killing the most people.” Maybe, but the sasquatches whom the volcano displaced contributed to the statistics, too, if only out of self-defense. Brooks places the epicenter of the Bigfoot war in a high-tech hideaway populated by the kind of people you might find in a Jurassic Park franchise: the schmo who doesn’t know how to do much of anything but tries anyway, the well-intentioned bleeding heart, the know-it-all intellectual who turns out to know the wrong things, the immigrant with a tough backstory and an instinct for survival. Indeed, the novel does double duty as a survival manual, packed full of good advice—for instance, try not to get wounded, for “injury turns you from a giver to a taker. Taking up our resources, our time to care for you.” Brooks presents a case for making room for Bigfoot in the world while peppering his narrative with timely social criticism about bad behavior on the human side of the conflict: The explosion of Rainier might have been better forecast had the president not slashed the budget of the U.S. Geological Survey, leading to “immediate suspension of the National Volcano Early Warning System,” and there’s always someone around looking to monetize the natural disaster and the sasquatch-y onslaught that follows. Brooks is a pro at building suspense even if it plays out in some rather spectacularly yucky episodes, one involving a short spear that takes its name from “the sucking sound of pulling it out of the dead man’s heart and lungs.” Grossness aside, it puts you right there on the scene.

A tasty, if not always tasteful, tale of supernatural mayhem that fans of King and Crichton alike will enjoy.

Pub Date: June 16, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-9848-2678-7

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Del Rey/Ballantine

Review Posted Online: Feb. 9, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2020

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FOURTH WING

From the Empyrean series , Vol. 1

Read this for the action-packed plot, not character development or worldbuilding.

On the orders of her mother, a woman goes to dragon-riding school.

Even though her mother is a general in Navarre’s army, 20-year-old Violet Sorrengail was raised by her father to follow his path as a scribe. After his death, though, Violet's mother shocks her by forcing her to enter the elite and deadly dragon rider academy at Basgiath War College. Most students die at the War College: during training sessions, at the hands of their classmates, or by the very dragons they hope to one day be paired with. From Day One, Violet is targeted by her classmates, some because they hate her mother, others because they think she’s too physically frail to succeed. She must survive a daily gauntlet of physical challenges and the deadly attacks of classmates, which she does with the help of secret knowledge handed down by her two older siblings, who'd been students there before her. Violet is at the mercy of the plot rather than being in charge of it, hurtling through one obstacle after another. As a result, the story is action-packed and fast-paced, but Violet is a strange mix of pure competence and total passivity, always managing to come out on the winning side. The book is categorized as romantasy, with Violet pulled between the comforting love she feels from her childhood best friend, Dain Aetos, and the incendiary attraction she feels for family enemy Xaden Riorson. However, the way Dain constantly undermines Violet's abilities and his lack of character development make this an unconvincing storyline. The plots and subplots aren’t well-integrated, with the first half purely focused on Violet’s training, followed by a brief detour for romance, and then a final focus on outside threats.

Read this for the action-packed plot, not character development or worldbuilding.

Pub Date: May 2, 2023

ISBN: 9781649374042

Page Count: 528

Publisher: Red Tower

Review Posted Online: Jan. 12, 2024

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