Olemaun’s spirit and determination shine through this moving memoir.

READ REVIEW

A STRANGER AT HOME

A TRUE STORY

After two years in Catholic residential school, 10-year-old Olemaun returns to Tuktoyaktuk on Canada's Arctic coast, a stranger to her friends and family, unaccustomed to the food and clothing and unable to speak or understand her native language.

Margaret Pokiak's story continues after the events of Fatty Legs (2010), which described her boarding-school experience. In this stand-alone sequel, she describes a year of reintegration into her Inuvialuit world. At first, her mother doesn't even recognize her: “Not my girl,” she says. Amini-Holmes illustrates this scene and others with full-page paintings in somber colors. The sad faces echo the child's misery. Gradually, though, with the help of her understanding father, she readjusts—even learning to drive a dog team. She contrasts her experience with that of the man the villagers call Du-bil-ak, the devil, a dark-skinned trapper no one speaks to. She has a home she can get used to again; he would always be alien. The first-person narrative is filled with details of this Inuit family’s adjustment to a new way of life in which books and reading matter as much as traditional skills. A scrapbook of photographs at the end helps readers enter this unfamiliar world, as do the occasional notes and afterword.

Olemaun’s spirit and determination shine through this moving memoir. (Memoir. 8-12)

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-55451-362-8

Page Count: 124

Publisher: Annick Press

Review Posted Online: Sept. 21, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15, 2011

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MAMMOTH BONES AND BROKEN STONES

THE MYSTERY OF NORTH AMERICA'S FIRST PEOPLE

How and when the Western Hemisphere, particularly North and South America, came to be populated continues to be both mysterious and controversial for scientists. Archaeologists plug away with the tools at their disposal but have “more questions than answers.” Harrison does a good job setting the issue in context. He describes the earliest efforts to identify the original inhabitants of the continents, exploring the Clovis culture, believed by many to be the first humans to reach North America. After clearly explaining how scholars decided that they were first, he then lists the arguments against this hypothesis. In the course of looking at both sides, he introduces young readers to “the strict rules of archaeology.” The author demonstrates the precise work of those attempting to understand the hidden aspects of human history and how many of these old questions are seen in the light of new technologies and discoveries. The narrative is aided by both photographs and original illustrations that imagine scenes from both the distant past and the field experiences. (glossary, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 9-12)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-1-59078-561-4

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Boyds Mills

Review Posted Online: Aug. 17, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2010

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Jones catches the beauty of fair trade in the way it strengthens morale and human dignity for all those engaged, and she...

A FAIR DEAL

SHOPPING FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE

From the Orca Footprints series

“Fair trade is not about spending more money or buying more stuff. It’s about bringing justice to people around the world.” Fair enough.

And as readers take Jones’ tour through the lands of fair trade and its role in social justice, they learn where things come from and go to. The story of fair trade is quite buoyant, because it is not just a pipe dream. As Jones notes in one of the numerous, captivating factoids that pepper the margins of the book, “fair trade products are now sold in more than 120 countries.” Numerous stock photographs bring a snappy immediacy to the story, as do Jones’ anecdotes of her own experiences with fair trade. Jones does a particularly good job bringing individuals to the fore so that readers can both identify with them and learn how these people can band together with other small producers into cooperatives to become a market force. “Ninety percent of the world’s cocoa is grown on small family farms by about six million farmers,” so it doesn’t take a math genius to appreciate that buying fair trade chocolate benefits a lot of people. Jones also presents a handful of ways that kids can encourage fair trade awareness.

Jones catches the beauty of fair trade in the way it strengthens morale and human dignity for all those engaged, and she provides a grounded (and painless) introduction to world geography. (Nonfiction. 8-12)

Pub Date: Oct. 3, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4598-1043-3

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Orca

Review Posted Online: July 2, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2017

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