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THE SUPREME COURT AND US

Creative and informative, this child-friendly legal primer will be a great addition to home and school libraries.

Two young girls go sightseeing in Washington, D.C., and learn about the history of the judicial body, its functioning, and its impact on society.

First, Ada and Bea (who have no adults accompanying them) visit the U.S. Capitol, where a friendly female African American judge educates them about her profession. Next stop is the Washington Monument, where a White male photographer teaches them about the three branches of government and the concept of the separation of powers, using his tripod as an object lesson. Inside the National Archives Building, an anthropomorphic master copy of the Constitution enlightens the girls about the Judiciary Act of 1789. After that, a White male lawyer lets the girls tour his office, where portraits of federal justices and regular citizens involved in landmark Supreme Court cases come to life and share their stories. The final stop is, of course, the Supreme Court Building itself, where yet more accommodating adults help the protagonists gain an understanding of court procedures. Colorful graphic-novel panels and speech bubbles throughout make this important topic approachable. The main characters have tan skin and Bea is possibly Asian American. The backmatter includes capsule biographies of several Supreme Court justices, a timeline of events that led up to the historic Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka ruling on school desegregation, a glossary, and a list of court cases referenced in the book.

Creative and informative, this child-friendly legal primer will be a great addition to home and school libraries. (Nonfiction picture book. 6-10)

Pub Date: March 1, 2022

ISBN: 978-0-8075-7664-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Whitman

Review Posted Online: Dec. 15, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2022

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LITTLE DAYMOND LEARNS TO EARN

It’s hard to argue with success, but guides that actually do the math will be more useful to budding capitalists.

How to raise money for a coveted poster: put your friends to work!

John, founder of the FUBU fashion line and a Shark Tank venture capitalist, offers a self-referential blueprint for financial success. Having only half of the $10 he needs for a Minka J poster, Daymond forks over $1 to buy a plain T-shirt, paints a picture of the pop star on it, sells it for $5, and uses all of his cash to buy nine more shirts. Then he recruits three friends to decorate them with his design and help sell them for an unspecified amount (from a conveniently free and empty street-fair booth) until they’re gone. The enterprising entrepreneur reimburses himself for the shirts and splits the remaining proceeds, which leaves him with enough for that poster as well as a “brand-new business book,” while his friends express other fiscal strategies: saving their share, spending it all on new art supplies, or donating part and buying a (math) book with the rest. (In a closing summation, the author also suggests investing in stocks, bonds, or cryptocurrency.) Though Miles cranks up the visual energy in her sparsely detailed illustrations by incorporating bright colors and lots of greenbacks, the actual advice feels a bit vague. Daymond is Black; most of the cast are people of color. (This book was reviewed digitally.)

It’s hard to argue with success, but guides that actually do the math will be more useful to budding capitalists. (Picture book. 7-9)

Pub Date: March 21, 2023

ISBN: 978-0-593-56727-2

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: Dec. 13, 2022

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2023

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STELLA DÍAZ HAS SOMETHING TO SAY

From the Stella Díaz series , Vol. 1

A nice and timely depiction of an immigrant child experience.

Speaking up is hard when you’re shy, and it can be even harder if you’ve got two languages in your head.

Third-grader Estrella “Stella” Díaz, is a shy, Mexican-American girl who draws pictures and loves fish, and she lives in Chicago with her mother and older brother, Nick. Jenny, Stella’s best friend, isn’t in her class this year, and Stella feels lonely—especially when she sees that Vietnamese-American Jenny is making new friends. When a new student, Stanley Mason, arrives in her class, Stella introduces herself in Spanish to the white former Texan without realizing it and becomes embarrassed. Surely Stanley won’t want to befriend her after that—but he seems to anyway. Stella often confuses the pronunciation between English and Spanish sounds and takes speech classes. As an immigrant with a green card—a “legal alien,” according to her teacher—Stella feels that she doesn’t fully belong to either American culture or Mexican culture, and this is nicely reflected in her not being fully comfortable in either language, an experience familiar to many immigrant and first-generation children. This early-middle-grade book features italicized Spanish words and phrases with direct translations right after. There is a small subplot about bullying from Stella’s classmate, and readers will cheer as they see how, with the help of her friends and family, Stella overcomes her shyness and gives a presentation on Jacques Cousteau. Dominguez’s friendly black-and-white drawings grace most pages.

A nice and timely depiction of an immigrant child experience. (Fiction. 7-10)

Pub Date: Jan. 16, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-62672-858-5

Page Count: 208

Publisher: Roaring Brook Press

Review Posted Online: Nov. 12, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2017

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