A lively read-aloud promoting the virtues of sportsmanship.

READ REVIEW

EVIE'S FIELD DAY

MORE THAN ONE WAY TO WIN

A competitive youth learns the value of kindness over victory.

Evie can run, jump, and hop the fastest, highest, and farthest. She also has the “trophies and ribbons” to prove it. Her love of accolades is what makes the upcoming Field Day so exciting. “Zing! Zing! Zip!” When it’s Evie’s turn at beanbag toss, she misses all three times. Everyone shouts, “Hooray!” for the winner. “Except Evie.” Next it’s “musical hoops,” and even though Evie can hop the farthest, Marty wins. Evie and her friends are largely portrayed in black and white with pops of bright colors in clothing, props, and accessories. The succinct text narrates as Evie attempts more carnival games: balancing a glass of water on her head, running with an egg on a spoon, or a balloon-stomping competition. Despite her best efforts she is still empty handed. Finally her “favorite event—the sack race” provides her a chance. “Evie jumped high, Evie jumped fast. Evie jumped far. She was winning!” Just then a baby bird in the middle of the route forces her to stop and quickly make a choice whether a ribbon or an act of compassion is more important. Teba infuses each scene with charm and energy. Within the black-and-white color schema, Evie has dark hair and medium-toned skin, and her friends are diverse. Resources on fostering sportsmanship follow the story.

A lively read-aloud promoting the virtues of sportsmanship. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: May 1, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-7330359-0-3

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Cardinal Rule Press

Review Posted Online: Jan. 21, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2020

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This seemingly simple tale packs a satisfying emotional punch. Scarily good! (Picture book. 4-7)

LOVE MONSTER

Monster lives in Cutesville, where he feels his googly eyes make him unlovable, especially compared to all the “cute, fluffy” kittens, puppies and bunnies. He goes off to find someone who will appreciate him just the way he is…with funny and heartwarming results.

A red, scraggly, pointy-eared, arm-dragging monster with a pronounced underbite clutches his monster doll to one side of his chest, exposing a purplish blue heart on the other. His oversized eyes express his loneliness. Bright could not have created a more sympathetic and adorable character. But she further impresses with the telling of this poor chap’s journey. Since Monster is not the “moping-around sort,” he strikes out on his own to find someone who will love him. “He look[s] high” from on top of a hill, and “he look[s] low” at the bottom of the same hill. The page turn reveals a rolling (and labeled) tumbleweed on a flat stretch. Here “he look[s] middle-ish.” Careful pacing combines with dramatic design and the deadpan text to make this sad search a very funny one. When it gets dark and scary, he decides to head back home. A bus’s headlights shine on his bent figure. All seems hopeless—until the next page surprises, with a smiling, orange monster with long eyelashes and a pink heart on her chest depicted at the wheel. And “in the blink of a googly eye / everything change[s].”

This seemingly simple tale packs a satisfying emotional punch. Scarily good! (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: Dec. 31, 2013

ISBN: 978-0-374-34646-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Review Posted Online: Sept. 18, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2013

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Droll humor that’s sure to elicit guffaws.

PLEASE DON'T EAT ME

A bunny negotiates with a bear to avoid becoming lunch.

Burrowing along happily through the soil, a tiny white rabbit is stopped short by the beauty of a daisy. Unfortunately, a bear steps out from behind a tree at precisely the same moment. There’s no mistaking the bunny’s disappointment at the timing of the situation: “Aw, nuts.” The bear is hungry, so the quick-thinking rabbit proposes ordering a pizza. The pair share a pie, but before the bunny can leave, Bear muses, “It just doesn’t feel like a meal without dessert.” Will the bunny be dessert?! No. A chuckleworthy page turn reveals the two sharing a milkshake with giant twisty straws. Bear has many other ways of delaying the bunny’s departure until finally, the bunny loses patience: “Fine. That’s it! Just eat me already!” Flopped on a bed of greens, the bunny presents itself as a meal. But Bear has another option—perhaps they could be friends instead. The dumpy little rabbit mirrors Bear’s rotund frame; both state their arguments with deadpan precision. However, via tiny adjustments in body language, Climo masterfully includes a ton of expression behind the two protagonists’ tiny dotted eyes. Minimalist cartoon backgrounds keep the focus on the developing relationship.

Droll humor that’s sure to elicit guffaws. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Oct. 15, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-316-31525-8

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: July 28, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2019

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