Say oui to this thoughtful and intelligent story of outsiders rising up.

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PIGLETTES

A gloriously feminist, fat-positive romp translated from the French.

After school bullies name them the gold, silver, and bronze winners respectively in the annual Pig Pageant on social media, Astrid Blomvall, Hakima Idriss, and Mireille Laplanche are battered but unbowed. The three girls concoct a plan to cycle to Paris in time for the Bastille Day celebration, where each will fulfill a personal dream. Mireille is eager to meet her biological father, a philosophy professor who is married to the French president and does not know she exists. Hakima, whose brother, Kader, lost his legs fighting for France in a desert war and who serves as the girls’ chaperone on their weeklong journey, would like to confront the general who has not given him credit for his brave sacrifice. Astrid, meanwhile, would like to meet Indochine, her favorite band, who will be performing at the garden party and whose music has given her the strength to persevere in the face of hardship. The four misfits become national celebrities as France rallies around their cause. Respecting the ability of teen readers to interpret challenging material without having lessons spelled out for them, the work is a mixture of righteous fury and light, witty banter. Addressing racism (the Idriss family are Muslim immigrants), misogyny, and fat-phobia, the story is a refreshing and empowering coming-of-age tale.

Say oui to this thoughtful and intelligent story of outsiders rising up. (Fiction. 12-18)

Pub Date: Aug. 8, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-78269-120-4

Page Count: 289

Publisher: Pushkin Press

Review Posted Online: Feb. 17, 2019

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An earnest examination of mental health in sports.

GEESE ARE NEVER SWANS

Sixteen-year-old Gus Bennett lives in the shadow of his older brother, Danny, a former Olympic swimming hopeful who recently died by suicide.

Gus does not have an easy home life: He has a strained relationship with his mother, a single parent who’s still struggling after Danny’s death; and his older sister, Darien, has a drug addiction and abandoned her now 18-month-old child to the care of their mother. But Gus hopes to train with Coach Marks, the renowned trainer who worked with his brother. He even sneaks into the country club to get access to the pool, willing to do whatever it takes to succeed. He has his eye on qualifying for the national team and seems poised for success, but he soon experiences a downward spiral and engages in reckless behavior. Although the side characters are underdeveloped, Gus’ first-person narration carries the story along smoothly. Conceptualized by the late Academy Award–winning basketball player Bryant and written by Clark, this emotional novel contains lyrical prose that beautifully captures the energy of swimming and short chapters that will keep readers engaged. Physical descriptions are limited, suggesting a white default, but naming conventions suggest some diversity among the swim team members.

An earnest examination of mental health in sports. (resources) (Fiction. 12-18)

Pub Date: July 21, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-949520-05-7

Page Count: 288

Publisher: Granity Studios

Review Posted Online: June 1, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2020

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This story is necessary. This story is important.

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THE HATE U GIVE

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter is a black girl and an expert at navigating the two worlds she exists in: one at Garden Heights, her black neighborhood, and the other at Williamson Prep, her suburban, mostly white high school.

Walking the line between the two becomes immensely harder when Starr is present at the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend, Khalil, by a white police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Khalil’s death becomes national news, where he’s called a thug and possible drug dealer and gangbanger. His death becomes justified in the eyes of many, including one of Starr’s best friends at school. The police’s lackadaisical attitude sparks anger and then protests in the community, turning it into a war zone. Questions remain about what happened in the moments leading to Khalil’s death, and the only witness is Starr, who must now decide what to say or do, if anything. Thomas cuts to the heart of the matter for Starr and for so many like her, laying bare the systemic racism that undergirds her world, and she does so honestly and inescapably, balancing heartbreak and humor. With smooth but powerful prose delivered in Starr’s natural, emphatic voice, finely nuanced characters, and intricate and realistic relationship dynamics, this novel will have readers rooting for Starr and opening their hearts to her friends and family.

This story is necessary. This story is important. (Fiction. 14-adult)

Pub Date: Feb. 28, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-06-249853-3

Page Count: 464

Publisher: Balzer + Bray/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: Dec. 6, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2016

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