A frank, funny self-help book perfect for those who view the genre with a healthy bit of skepticism.

READ REVIEW

YOU-NICORN

A 30-DAY WORKBOOK TO FIND YOUR INNER UNICORN AND START LIVING THE LIFE YOU LOVE

A guide promises to help readers get out of ruts and start living more authentic, fulfilling lives.

At age 35, Vincent (You-Nicorn Journal, 2018, etc.) looked like she had made it, at least professionally. She had a six-figure job at the Oprah Winfrey Network, but her work didn’t excite her, and her personal and inner lives were the “equivalent of a stagnant pond.” So she embarked on an intense journey of self-discovery and self-help and was able to turn her life from ho-hum into something far more satisfying. Now, in her manual, she offers a crash course for others who are looking to change their lives but aren’t sure how or where to begin. Vincent freely (and refreshingly) acknowledges that many, including herself, are skeptical about self-help mumbo-jumbo and openly declares that “this book is for cynics.” But she nonetheless urges readers to give her monthlong program a try, tackling a single chapter and its accompanying action steps per day. Each short, easy-to-digest section focuses on a different challenge or roadblock, such as success, mental health, friendships, forgiveness, and meditation, and the daily steps are meaningful but not so ambitious as to be overwhelming. Rather than demanding that readers transform their lives overnight, the author suggests low-commitment but still impactful activities like writing down a situation they’d like to alter and brainstorming solutions or putting together a list of daily affirmations. The result is a sort of “Whole30” diet for life, a plan meant to jump-start readers on the path to wellness. The author’s own experiences deeply inform her spirited, offbeat work, which gives the advice an idiosyncratic feel—she delves into managing road rage, discusses “esoteric magic items” like talismans and “bath spells,” and explains how Dreiser’s Sister Carrie inspired her attitude about work. It’s a bit of a wild ride at times, but her sheer enthusiasm, combined with her quirky, conversational style and the volume’s charming, uncredited illustrations, makes this an enjoyable and often thought-provoking read.

A frank, funny self-help book perfect for those who view the genre with a healthy bit of skepticism.

Pub Date: April 30, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-9994392-5-8

Page Count: 272

Publisher: HEA Publisher, LLC

Review Posted Online: April 13, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2018

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

Did you like this book?

WHAT A WONDERFUL WORLD

A LIFETIME OF RECORDINGS

Noted jazz and pop record producer Thiele offers a chatty autobiography. Aided by record-business colleague Golden, Thiele traces his career from his start as a ``pubescent, novice jazz record producer'' in the 1940s through the '50s, when he headed Coral, Dot, and Roulette Records, and the '60s, when he worked for ABC and ran the famous Impulse! jazz label. At Coral, Thiele championed the work of ``hillbilly'' singer Buddy Holly, although the only sessions he produced with Holly were marred by saccharine strings. The producer specialized in more mainstream popsters like the irrepressibly perky Teresa Brewer (who later became his fourth wife) and the bubble-machine muzak-meister Lawrence Welk. At Dot, Thiele was instrumental in recording Jack Kerouac's famous beat- generation ramblings to jazz accompaniment (recordings that Dot's president found ``pornographic''), while also overseeing a steady stream of pop hits. He then moved to the Mafia-controlled Roulette label, where he observed the ``silk-suited, pinky-ringed'' entourage who frequented the label's offices. Incredibly, however, Thiele remembers the famously hard-nosed Morris Levy, who ran the label and was eventually convicted of extortion, as ``one of the kindest, most warm-hearted, and classiest music men I have ever known.'' At ABC/Impulse!, Thiele oversaw the classic recordings of John Coltrane, although he is the first to admit that Coltrane essentially produced his own sessions. Like many producers of the day, Thiele participated in the ownership of publishing rights to some of the songs he recorded; he makes no apology for this practice, which he calls ``entirely appropriate and without any ethical conflicts.'' A pleasant, if not exactly riveting, memoir that will be of most interest to those with a thirst for cocktail-hour stories of the record biz. (25 halftones, not seen)

Pub Date: May 1, 1995

ISBN: 0-19-508629-4

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Oxford Univ.

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1995

Did you like this book?

more