Fans of Jeter and Mantell’s earlier books will find more of the same here.

FAIR BALL

Crises loom when a close friend suddenly turns standoffish, and the distraction affects young Derek’s play on the field.

Exemplifying No. 4 of Jeter’s Life Lessons, “The World Isn’t Always Fair,” the episode chronicles the drive to a citywide Little League trophy. The story acts as a platform for homilies about coping with bad breaks in baseball (and therefore life), frequent expostulations about fairness, and discussions of diversity with allusions to racial and class prejudice. Disturbed and angry that his wealthy, white friend Dave is abruptly avoiding him, Derek has such trouble keeping his head in the game that he whiffs at the plate and even muffs a play on the way to a playoff loss. It’s only a setback, though, and so amid pep talks and heroic plays capped by a walk-off inside-the-park home run, he goes on to lead the Indians (a team name that passes without comment here) to ultimate triumph. Meanwhile Derek defends a frenemy from bullies at school, studies for his finals, turns 11, and, with little sister Sharlee, absorbs the message that differences should be celebrated. The problem with Dave, which turns out to stem from a parental command to steer clear of the biracial, middle-class Jeters, is solved with an air-clearing tête-à-tête between the moms, and by the end everyone is looking forward to an awesome summer.

Fans of Jeter and Mantell’s earlier books will find more of the same here. (Fiction. 8-10)

Pub Date: April 18, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4814-9148-8

Page Count: 176

Publisher: Jeter/Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: Jan. 17, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2017

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Ironically, by choosing such a dramatic catalyst, the author weakens the adventure’s impact overall and leaves readers to...

ESCAPE FROM BAXTERS' BARN

A group of talking farm animals catches wind of the farm owner’s intention to burn the barn (with them in it) for insurance money and hatches a plan to flee.

Bond begins briskly—within the first 10 pages, barn cat Burdock has overheard Dewey Baxter’s nefarious plan, and by Page 17, all of the farm animals have been introduced and Burdock is sharing the terrifying news. Grady, Dewey’s (ever-so-slightly) more principled brother, refuses to go along, but instead of standing his ground, he simply disappears. This leaves the animals to fend for themselves. They do so by relying on their individual strengths and one another. Their talents and personalities match their species, bringing an element of realism to balance the fantasy elements. However, nothing can truly compensate for the bland horror of the premise. Not the growing sense of family among the animals, the serendipitous intervention of an unknown inhabitant of the barn, nor the convenient discovery of an alternate home. Meanwhile, Bond’s black-and-white drawings, justly compared to those of Garth Williams, amplify the sense of dissonance. Charming vignettes and single- and double-page illustrations create a pastoral world into which the threat of large-scale violence comes as a shock.

Ironically, by choosing such a dramatic catalyst, the author weakens the adventure’s impact overall and leaves readers to ponder the awkward coincidences that propel the plot. (Animal fantasy. 8-10)

Pub Date: July 7, 2015

ISBN: 978-0-544-33217-1

Page Count: 256

Publisher: HMH Books

Review Posted Online: April 1, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2015

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The second installment in this spirited series is a hit.

WAYS TO GROW LOVE

From the Ryan Hart series , Vol. 2

A new baby coming means Ryan has lots of opportunities to grow love.

Ryan has so much to look forward to this summer—she is going to be a big sister, and she finally gets to go to church camp! But new adventures bring challenges, too. Ryan feels like the baby is taking forever to arrive, and with Mom on bed rest, she isn’t able to participate in the family’s typical summer activities. Ryan’s Dad is still working the late shift, which means he gets home and goes to bed when she and her older brother, Ray, are waking up, so their quality daddy-daughter time is limited to one day a week. When the time for camp finally arrives, Ryan is so worried about bugs, ghosts, and sharing a cabin that she wonders if she should go at all. Watson’s heroine is smart and courageous, bringing her optimistic attitude to any challenge she faces. Hard topics like family finances and complex relationships with friends are discussed in an age-appropriate way. Watson continues to excel at crafting a sense of place; she transports readers to Portland, Oregon, with an attention to detail that can only come from someone who has loved that city. Ryan, her family, and friends are Black, and occasional illustrations by Mata spotlight their joy and make this book shine.

The second installment in this spirited series is a hit. (Fiction. 8-10)

Pub Date: April 27, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-5476-0058-8

Page Count: 192

Publisher: Bloomsbury

Review Posted Online: March 17, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2021

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