FRANKENWEENIE

More a commercial-minded keepsake than a movie storybook, with barely a mention of either plotline or filmmaking techniques.

An elaborate teaser for the stop-motion feature film offers slide shows, video clips and opportunities aplenty for additional purchases.

The enhanced e-book is composed of stills, developmental “sketch to screen” slide shows, snippets of video and bite-sized passages of bland descriptive text. Successive chapters offer introductions to Tim Burton’s work (including the early short film that inspired this feature version), the new release’s suburban setting, a traveling exhibition of props and its cast. This last ranges from nerdy young Victor and his classmates to the beloved dog he revivifies, a mummy hamster and other featured creatures. The several further “chapters” are thinly disguised links to movie-ticket vendors and more print and music spinoffs. An interactive collage maker at the beginning is crudely designed, and later 3-D views of selected characters are slow to turn and heavily pixelated. Still, page swipes and tap-activated close-ups work smoothly, as do the native dictionary and search features. Moreover, the plethora of visual material does provide a clear sense of the film’s stylized look and appeal, plus glimpses of how stop-motion puppets are constructed and convincingly photographed.

More a commercial-minded keepsake than a movie storybook, with barely a mention of either plotline or filmmaking techniques. (Enhanced e-book. 6-9)

Pub Date: Sept. 28, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Disney Publishing Worldwide Applications

Review Posted Online: Oct. 23, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 2012

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DOG MAN

From the Dog Man series , Vol. 1

What a wag.

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What do you get from sewing the head of a smart dog onto the body of a tough police officer? A new superhero from the incorrigible creator of Captain Underpants.

Finding a stack of old Dog Mancomics that got them in trouble back in first grade, George and Harold decide to craft a set of new(ish) adventures with (more or less) improved art and spelling. These begin with an origin tale (“A Hero Is Unleashed”), go on to a fiendish attempt to replace the chief of police with a “Robo Chief” and then a temporarily successful scheme to make everyone stupid by erasing all the words from every book (“Book ’Em, Dog Man”), and finish off with a sort of attempted alien invasion evocatively titled “Weenie Wars: The Franks Awaken.” In each, Dog Man squares off against baddies (including superinventor/archnemesis Petey the cat) and saves the day with a clever notion. With occasional pauses for Flip-O-Rama featurettes, the tales are all framed in brightly colored sequential panels with hand-lettered dialogue (“How do you feel, old friend?” “Ruff!”) and narrative. The figures are studiously diverse, with police officers of both genders on view and George, the chief, and several other members of the supporting cast colored in various shades of brown. Pilkey closes as customary with drawing exercises, plus a promise that the canine crusader will be further unleashed in a sequel.

What a wag. (Graphic fantasy. 7-9)

Pub Date: Aug. 30, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-545-58160-8

Page Count: 240

Publisher: Graphix/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: May 31, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2016

DIARY OF A SPIDER

The wriggly narrator of Diary of a Worm (2003) puts in occasional appearances, but it’s his arachnid buddy who takes center stage here, with terse, tongue-in-cheek comments on his likes (his close friend Fly, Charlotte’s Web), his dislikes (vacuums, people with big feet), nervous encounters with a huge Daddy Longlegs, his extended family—which includes a Grandpa more than willing to share hard-won wisdom (The secret to a long, happy life: “Never fall asleep in a shoe.”)—and mishaps both at spider school and on the human playground. Bliss endows his garden-dwellers with faces and the odd hat or other accessory, and creates cozy webs or burrows colorfully decorated with corks, scraps, plastic toys and other human detritus. Spider closes with the notion that we could all get along, “just like me and Fly,” if we but got to know one another. Once again, brilliantly hilarious. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 2005

ISBN: 0-06-000153-4

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Joanna Cotler/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2005

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