Despite some features with limited shelf life, a useful start to exploring the body’s full sensorium.

READ REVIEW

SENSEATIONAL ILLUSIONS

Pop-ups and bright graphics demonstrate that humans have more than five senses to fool.

This busy book expands the traditional set of senses to no fewer than 18 at the outset. Though it doesn’t get to all of them, along with color-based effects and other optical illusions, it offers ways of tricking nose and tongue, challenges to pattern recognition, demonstrations of proprioception, and tests of reflex speed. The small but varied bundle of interactive extras includes a sliding panel of colored acetate, a pop-up visual puzzle, a section of scratch-and-sniff dots, and a slotted maze at the end through which to roll ball bearings (included). Subtle embossing defines several animals hidden under flaps and two other mazes that readers are directed to trace with eyes closed, but it’s likely too low for all but braille-trained fingertips. Still, in general the neatly presented visuals and accompanying instructions are easy to follow, produce reliable results, and come with descriptions of the expected effect, its causes, and the body part involved.

Despite some features with limited shelf life, a useful start to exploring the body’s full sensorium. (Informational pop-up. 8-10)

Pub Date: Oct. 6, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-4654-3829-4

Page Count: 32

Publisher: DK Publishing

Review Posted Online: Sept. 16, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2015

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With a rhythm and rhyme that never falter, Slade offers readers insect-themed word problems: “Four hungry honey bees / dance...

MULTIPLY ON THE FLY

Rhyming verse presents buggy word problems that can all be solved using multiplication.

With a rhythm and rhyme that never falter, Slade offers readers insect-themed word problems: “Four hungry honey bees / dance a buggy beat— / tappin’ with six furry legs. / How many dancing feet? / 4 x 6 = ?” The 11 multiplication facts, seemingly randomly chosen, each include one of the numbers from one to 11. While no doubt good practice the first time through, it precludes repeated readings and incorporates only a smattering of facts. Hunter, with specialties in entomological and botanical illustration, truly makes the text come alive. Her insects are realistically detailed and seem ready to crawl right out of the pages. But while they are fascinating to look at, they are not always the easiest to use as counters in answering the problems. The ladybug spots and walking stick parts are too small to count, and for those not in the know, the soldier ants appear to have only one pair of eyes rather than the five eyes of the math problem. Backmatter includes extensive information and questions to help readers learn more about insects. A final page provides a multiplication table as well as a breakdown of each problem from the text.

Pub Date: Aug. 10, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-60718-128-6

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Sylvan Dell

Review Posted Online: July 5, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2011

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