In or out of the courtroom, Copperman’s right on the money.

INHERIT THE SHOES

Prolific Copperman launches a new series starring a defense attorney who could give Perry Mason a run for his money.

Tired of prosecuting low-level grifters in New Jersey, Sandy Moss heads to sunny LA to join Seaton, Taylor, Evans, and Bach, whose practice is limited to squeaky-clean corporate cases. Divorce settlements are as down and dirty as Seaton, Taylor gets, and then only for high-value clients like Pat Dunwoody, the star of TV legal thriller Legality, who’s looking for release from his promiscuous wife, singer Patsy DeNunzio. Sandy’s first assignment is to sit silently next to senior partner Junius Bach during the contentious Dunwoody-DeNunzio property negotiations, a task she fails miserably by revealing to opposing counsel her side’s chief strategy. Junius is livid, but Pat so admires Sandy’s spunk that he demands that Seaton, Taylor assign her to defend him after Patsy’s inevitable murder. Dunwoody, who reverts to his stage name of Patrick McNabb after his wife’s death, seems deeply confused about the difference between being a lawyer and playing one on TV. Not only is he unfazed by Sandy’s complete lack of experience as a defense attorney (after all, if she prosecuted cases, shouldn’t she know how to defend them?), he doesn’t pay much attention to the judge’s preferences, like having defendants not leave the country while they’re awaiting trial. Even with the help of her new maybe-boyfriend, paralegal Evan D’Arbanville, and her best friend, Angie, who arrives unexpectedly from New Jersey, Sandy has her hands full keeping a lid on irrepressible McNabb, and readers won’t want to miss a minute of the mayhem.

In or out of the courtroom, Copperman’s right on the money.

Pub Date: Jan. 5, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-7278-9084-9

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Severn House

Review Posted Online: Sept. 30, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15, 2020

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Forget about solving all these crimes; the signal triumph here is (spoiler) the heroine’s survival.

A CONSPIRACY OF BONES

Another sweltering month in Charlotte, another boatload of mysteries past and present for overworked, overstressed forensic anthropologist Temperance Brennan.

A week after the night she chases but fails to catch a mysterious trespasser outside her town house, some unknown party texts Tempe four images of a corpse that looks as if it’s been chewed by wild hogs, because it has been. Showboat Medical Examiner Margot Heavner makes it clear that, breaking with her department’s earlier practice (The Bone Collection, 2016, etc.), she has no intention of calling in Tempe as a consultant and promptly identifies the faceless body herself as that of a young Asian man. Nettled by several errors in Heavner’s analysis, and even more by her willingness to share the gory details at a press conference, Tempe launches her own investigation, which is not so much off the books as against the books. Heavner isn’t exactly mollified when Tempe, aided by retired police detective Skinny Slidell and a host of experts, puts a name to the dead man. But the hints of other crimes Tempe’s identification uncovers, particularly crimes against children, spur her on to redouble her efforts despite the new M.E.’s splenetic outbursts. Before he died, it seems, Felix Vodyanov was linked to a passenger ferry that sank in 1994, an even earlier U.S. government project to research biological agents that could control human behavior, the hinky spiritual retreat Sparkling Waters, the dark web site DeepUnder, and the disappearances of at least four schoolchildren, two of whom have also turned up dead. And why on earth was Vodyanov carrying Tempe’s own contact information? The mounting evidence of ever more and ever worse skulduggery will pull Tempe deeper and deeper down what even she sees as a rabbit hole before she confronts a ringleader implicated in “Drugs. Fraud. Breaking and entering. Arson. Kidnapping. How does attempted murder sound?”

Forget about solving all these crimes; the signal triumph here is (spoiler) the heroine’s survival.

Pub Date: March 17, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-9821-3888-2

Page Count: 352

Publisher: Scribner

Review Posted Online: Dec. 23, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2020

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Space nerds will geek out, and everyone else eventually gets a pretty good ride.

THE APOLLO MURDERS

A vast Cold War space thriller from astronaut Hadfield.

Incorporating real-life characters and events, spanning decades and distances both terrestrial and translunar, this NASA-heavy thriller has everything, including perhaps a bit too many meticulously reported technical procedures. The story opens with not one but two aircraft episodes—a bird strike wrecks an F-4 Phantom and a Cessna 170B is taken out for a rhapsodic spin—then follows the developing career of Kaz Zemeckis, who, until the bird strike cost him an eye, had been a military astronaut with good prospects of going to the moon. Repurposed as a crew liaison for NASA, Zemeckis is involved in both the training for and the mission of Apollo 18. Hadfield's use of real people brings historical authenticity to the novel, and there are many tidbits of NASA lore that only an insider could provide, but the devotion to technical facts has some drawbacks. There are more moving parts to this novel than there are in a Saturn V, and Hadfield is careful to give each part a complete description: provenance, purpose, design, and in-use characteristics are all faithfully recorded. This makes the first part of the novel so technically focused that it seems the action will never get off the launchpad, though doubtless there are readers who will revel in these details. In the event, Apollo 18 is a complex mission. Initially charged with collecting geological samples and sabotaging the new Russian moon rover, the three astronauts are then told to sabotage the Russians' new spy satellite, which is thought to be unmanned but is not. The crisis created by this bungled attempt at space vandalism establishes the main narrative thread, with Zemeckis back at Mission Control in Houston struggling to keep the mission going. There is a murder and other deaths as well as injuries, vomiting, and space brawls, all reported in close detail. Though the climax is somewhat over-the-top, the basic bones of a good thriller are here even if the beginning is a slow burn.

Space nerds will geek out, and everyone else eventually gets a pretty good ride.

Pub Date: Oct. 12, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-31626-453-2

Page Count: 336

Publisher: Mulholland Books/Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: Aug. 18, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2021

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