THAT SWEET AND SAVAGE LAND by Emma Drummond

THAT SWEET AND SAVAGE LAND

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KIRKUS REVIEW

 War in 19th-century India at the height of the Raj and its gore and glory is background for a thorny romance involving two miserably wedded lovers. Another romantic yet spiny adventure by the author (a.k.a. Elizabeth Darrell) of Some Far Elusive Dawn (1991), etc. Elizabeth Delacourt, married to handsome Lieutenant William, is angry when her soldier husband takes off for India without her. It's not that Elizabeth misses William, or his thickheaded insistence that she be a mouselike, submissive wife without a thought in her head, but, rather, that she misses adventure. Besides, her in-laws are crashing bores. But then in England Elizabeth meets Captain John Stravenham, veteran of the Indian wars. There's instant mutual attraction--and a misunderstanding. Learning that Elizabeth, stirred and muzzy-headed, is not a widow (as she's led him to believe), John hies back to action in India; and Elizabeth, horrified by John's hurt, is off to India, too, unbeknownst to John. Of course, John (stewing in bitterness), William (furious), and Elizabeth (scared but exhilarated by the strange land and army life) will be together in camp. Before the last long march and battle, there'll be: the loss of a popular officer whose brother blames John; attempts by a tiny handful of women to aid the common soldier and his family; a bout of cholera; and, finally, the reality of war as John leads a ``tremendous military snake across the wide starlit plain...This was life...Here was true fulfillment.'' Liberated Elizabeth and life-scarred John will, naturally, find sweet rewards in a savage time. Like Drummond's others: a journeyman romance with some bright and gritty byways.

Pub Date: Aug. 1st, 1991
ISBN: 0-312-05973-6
Page count: 288pp
Publisher: St. Martin's
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15th, 1991