NEVER CAUGHT, THE STORY OF ONA JUDGE by Erica Armstrong Dunbar
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NEVER CAUGHT, THE STORY OF ONA JUDGE

George and Martha Washington's Courageous Slave Who Dared to Run Away; Young Readers Edition
Age Range: 9 - 13
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KIRKUS REVIEW

A young enslaved woman successfully escapes bondage in the household of George and Martha Washington.

Ona Judge was the daughter of a white indentured servant, Andrew Judge, and an enslaved woman, Betty, on the Mount Vernon plantation, growing up to become Martha Washington’s personal maid. When George Washington was elected president, it was up to Martha to decide who among their enslaved would go with them. “The criteria were clear: obedient, discreet, loyal slaves, preferably of mixed race.” After the seat of government moved to Philadelphia, the Washingtons were subject to the Gradual Abolition Act, a Pennsylvania law that mandated freedom for any enslaved person residing in state for more than six months. The Washingtons chose to rotate their enslaved out of the state to maintain ownership. In 1796, Martha Washington decided to give Ona as a wedding present to her granddaughter—but Ona made her escape by ship to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, setting up years of attempts by allies of Washington to return Ona to slavery. Despite poverty and hardship, Ona Judge remained free, thwarting the most powerful man in America. Dunbar, whose adult version of this story was a National Book Award finalist, and co-author Van Cleve have crafted a compelling read for young people. Ona Judge’s determination to maintain control over her life will resonate with readers. The accessible narrative, clear context, and intricately recorded details of the lives of the enslaved provide much-needed understanding of the complexities and contradictions of the country’s founding.

Necessary. (Biography. 9-13)

Pub Date: Jan. 8th, 2019
ISBN: 978-1-5344-1617-8
Page count: 256pp
Publisher: Aladdin
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15th, 2018




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