An occasionally pedantic historical account whose pros nevertheless outweigh its cons, and which should be taken up by...

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SHATTERED DREAMS AT KILIMANJARO

AN HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF GERMAN SETTLERS FROM PALESTINE WHO STARTED A NEW LIFE IN GERMAN EAST AFRICA IN THE LATE 19TH AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES

Traces the history of a group of 19th-century German Christians whose initial desire to bring the kingdom of God to Palestine eventually led to East Africa.

Formatted in the style of a high school textbook, this work exhibits some of the weaknesses frequently associated with the genre. The writing is informative but dry, and neither characters nor events are propelled forward with the help of a driving narrative force. That said, the book does delve into an unusual amalgamation of European, Middle Eastern and African history and provides a wealth of insight for anyone who comes new to the topic of German colonialism in Africa and the German immigrants known as the Templers. Committed to the prospect of creating God’s kingdom on Earth, the German Templers of the 19th century originally immigrated to Palestine, where they developed socially and economically viable communities primarily based on agricultural ventures. But as land grew scarce and economic opportunities dwindled, a new generation of Templers relocated from Palestine to the vast lands of Germany’s African colony in the area around Mount Kilimanjaro. There, the Templers repeated the economic and cultural successes they had fostered in the Holy Land, only to see their efforts fail as Germany embroiled itself in two successive world wars. There are many compelling stories to be told about these intrepid pioneers, from developing coffee plantations in the plains of Africa to enduring the deprivations of incarceration during times of war. The book is at its most engaging when the authors (themselves descendants of German Templers) allow the Templers to speak for themselves. The excerpts from diaries in which men and women describe their day-to-day lives are the most vivid passages in the book, and the many historical and family photographs offer a panoramic view of this bygone era.

An occasionally pedantic historical account whose pros nevertheless outweigh its cons, and which should be taken up by readers curious about a frequently overlooked moment in German and African history.

Pub Date: Dec. 13, 2007

ISBN: 978-1425139223

Page Count: 269

Publisher: Trafford

Review Posted Online: Jan. 7, 2011

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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WHAT A WONDERFUL WORLD

A LIFETIME OF RECORDINGS

Noted jazz and pop record producer Thiele offers a chatty autobiography. Aided by record-business colleague Golden, Thiele traces his career from his start as a ``pubescent, novice jazz record producer'' in the 1940s through the '50s, when he headed Coral, Dot, and Roulette Records, and the '60s, when he worked for ABC and ran the famous Impulse! jazz label. At Coral, Thiele championed the work of ``hillbilly'' singer Buddy Holly, although the only sessions he produced with Holly were marred by saccharine strings. The producer specialized in more mainstream popsters like the irrepressibly perky Teresa Brewer (who later became his fourth wife) and the bubble-machine muzak-meister Lawrence Welk. At Dot, Thiele was instrumental in recording Jack Kerouac's famous beat- generation ramblings to jazz accompaniment (recordings that Dot's president found ``pornographic''), while also overseeing a steady stream of pop hits. He then moved to the Mafia-controlled Roulette label, where he observed the ``silk-suited, pinky-ringed'' entourage who frequented the label's offices. Incredibly, however, Thiele remembers the famously hard-nosed Morris Levy, who ran the label and was eventually convicted of extortion, as ``one of the kindest, most warm-hearted, and classiest music men I have ever known.'' At ABC/Impulse!, Thiele oversaw the classic recordings of John Coltrane, although he is the first to admit that Coltrane essentially produced his own sessions. Like many producers of the day, Thiele participated in the ownership of publishing rights to some of the songs he recorded; he makes no apology for this practice, which he calls ``entirely appropriate and without any ethical conflicts.'' A pleasant, if not exactly riveting, memoir that will be of most interest to those with a thirst for cocktail-hour stories of the record biz. (25 halftones, not seen)

Pub Date: May 1, 1995

ISBN: 0-19-508629-4

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Oxford Univ.

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1995

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