An engaging sports story but not a home run for transgender representation. (Fiction. 8-12)

MY LIFE AS A DIAMOND

A transgender boy steps up to the plate to help his baseball team beat their rivals in the summer playoffs.

Caz Cadman, baseball ace, moves from Toronto to Redburn, Washington, with his family for a fresh start as a boy. He knows who he is, and now, with the support of his parents, he can be himself in a place where no one knows his history. Summer baseball tryouts place him on the Ravens, a team with a fierce rivalry with the Rockets. At first, Caz worries his teammates won’t take the game as seriously as he does, but they quickly band together and learn to play as a smart, fast, and tricky unit (just as ravens do). While the baseball story succeeds, the trans representation struggles. Amid conflict with the bullies on the Rockets, Caz holds onto concerns about what his new friends will think if they find out the truth about his past. While Caz’s parents accept him, his entire baseball team back in Toronto had turned against him, and during the climax, Caz is publicly outed before he’s ready. In seeking answers about himself, Caz turns to the internet, and the articles he finds fall back on the tired born-in-the-wrong-body narrative. Overall, the story lacks pride in identity and reinforces trope-y associations of secrecy and shame with trans people. It assumes a white default.

An engaging sports story but not a home run for transgender representation. (Fiction. 8-12) (Fiction8-12)

Pub Date: Sept. 25, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-4598-1831-6

Page Count: 176

Publisher: Orca

Review Posted Online: June 25, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2018

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Falters in its oversimplified portrayal of a complicated region and people.

GROUND ZERO

Parallel storylines take readers through the lives of two young people on Sept. 11 in 2001 and 2019.

In the contemporary timeline, Reshmina is an Afghan girl living in foothills near the Pakistan border that are a battleground between the Taliban and U.S. armed forces. She is keen to improve her English while her twin brother, Pasoon, is inspired by the Taliban and wants to avenge their older sister, killed by an American bomb on her wedding day. Reshmina helps a wounded American soldier, making her village a Taliban target. In 2001, Brandon Chavez is spending the day with his father, who works at the World Trade Center’s Windows on the World restaurant. Brandon is heading to the underground mall when a plane piloted by al-Qaida hits the tower, and his father is among those killed. The two storylines develop in parallel through alternating chapters. Gratz’s deeply moving writing paints vivid images of the loss and fear of those who lived through the trauma of 9/11. However, this nuance doesn’t extend to the Afghan characters; Reshmina and Pasoon feel one-dimensional. Descriptions of the Taliban’s Afghan victims and Reshmina's gentle father notwithstanding, references to all young men eventually joining the Taliban and Pasoon's zeal for their cause counteract this messaging. Explanations for the U.S. military invasion of Afghanistan in the author’s note and in characters’ conversations too simplistically present the U.S. presence.

Falters in its oversimplified portrayal of a complicated region and people. (author’s note) (Fiction. 9-12)

Pub Date: Feb. 2, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-338-24575-2

Page Count: 336

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: Dec. 15, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2021

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With Ivan’s movie out this year from Disney, expect great interest—it will be richly rewarded.

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THE ONE AND ONLY BOB

Tiny, sassy Bob the dog, friend of The One and Only Ivan (2012), returns to tell his tale.

Wisecracking Bob, who is a little bit Chihuahua among other things, now lives with his girl, Julia, and her parents. Happily, her father works at Wildworld Zoological Park and Sanctuary, the zoo where Bob’s two best friends, Ivan the gorilla and Ruby the elephant, live, so Bob gets to visit and catch up with them regularly. Due to an early betrayal, Bob doesn’t trust humans (most humans are good only for their thumbs); he fears he’s going soft living with Julia, and he’s certain he is a Bad Dog—as in “not a good representative of my species.” On a visit to the zoo with a storm threatening, Bob accidentally falls into the gorilla enclosure just as a tornado strikes. So that’s what it’s like to fly. In the storm’s aftermath, Bob proves to everyone (and finally himself) that there is a big heart in that tiny chest…and a brave one too. With this companion, Applegate picks up where her Newbery Medal winner left off, and fans will be overjoyed to ride along in the head of lovable, self-deprecating Bob on his storm-tossed adventure. His wry doggy observations and attitude are pitch perfect (augmented by the canine glossary and Castelao’s picture dictionary of dog postures found in the frontmatter). Gorilla Ivan described Julia as having straight, black hair in the previous title, and Castelao's illustrations in that volume showed her as pale-skinned. (Finished art not available for review.)

With Ivan’s movie out this year from Disney, expect great interest—it will be richly rewarded. (afterword) (Fiction. 8-12)

Pub Date: May 5, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-06-299131-7

Page Count: 352

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: March 25, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2020

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