A quick, accessible introduction for new caregivers.

READ REVIEW

Joan's Elder Care Guide

EMPOWERING YOU AND YOUR ELDER TO SURVIVE

A compact resource that addresses the typical concerns of those who care for the elderly.

Edwards (Flip Flap Floodle, 2004) draws on 14 years of personal experience caring for her aged mother, plus additional research, to provide a survey of issues that affect people thrust into similar roles. She poses questions and discusses the factors that affect what level of care an elder needs. However, when she tackles the subject of assisted-living and skilled-nursing facilities, it highlights the inherent challenge of writing this type of book. Regulation of such facilities varies from state to state, limiting how detailed and specific such advice can be, and there’s similar variation regarding medical care, insurance, wills, probate, and other, related matters. Edwards plows many furrows, most not very deeply. Twenty-one brief chapters span the logistical, medical, financial, legal, interpersonal, social, emotional, and spiritual issues that arise when one adult becomes responsible for another. Sometimes they cover subjects in only one sentence: “Support Groups: People join support groups to share experiences and common concerns, learn coping skills, and to give each other emotional support and comfort.” As a result, this is really a book of lists with some items expounded upon a bit more fully. Edwards offers readers dozens of sources for additional reading and provides endnotes; an appendix includes charts and forms to log information regarding schedules and medications. Overall, the book is strongest when the author shares tips from her own experience providing in-home care and when discussing communication—between the caregiver and elder, with health providers, and with substitute caregivers. In these moments, she effectively shares practical methods and systems that worked for her. The prose is conversational in tone, breezy at times, but clear throughout; readers who have already used hospice care, for example, will find her descriptions spot-on. She approaches every discussion, from relationships to religion, in an inclusive, nonjudgmental manner, and her hard-earned empathy shines through.

A quick, accessible introduction for new caregivers.

Pub Date: April 15, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-940310-40-4

Page Count: 176

Publisher: 4rv Nonfiction

Review Posted Online: Oct. 12, 2016

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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