A successful natural reference book and an easy-to-use planning and scheduling tool.

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The Power of Timing

LIVING IN HARMONY WITH NATURAL AND LUNAR CYCLES

A nature-based guide to health, nutrition, gardening, housekeeping and more.

In pre-industrial times, people worked in tandem with the cycles of nature. In this book, husband-and-wife team Paungger and Poppe (The Code, 2011) parlay the folk wisdom of “natural timing” into tools appropriate for modern life. Each combination of moon phase, sign and position, they write, correlates favorably to certain aspects of life and unfavorably to others. (Housecleaning, for example, goes more smoothly under a waning moon or a Virgo day, according to the authors.) Paungger’s rural Alpine upbringing informs many of these extensively delineated, eminently practical techniques. Some topics covered here, such as forestry, may be outside the ken of many suburbanites or city dwellers, but most of the advice speaks to readers in any location. Paungger and Poppe urge readers to watch such characteristics as the moon’s sign and position in the zodiac (specifically, whether it has the ascending, increasing force of winter and spring, or the descending, declining force of summer and fall). However, the authors’ approach is more complex than simply following moon phases, as in farmers’ almanacs’ planting charts. They also address matters not specifically connected to the moon, such as how to determine one’s specific nutritional type (and recommended diet) and how to find personality characteristics in the numbers of a birthdate. Although some information here runs to the technical, the overall tone is easy and conversational, with little hint that the text has been translated from German. To encourage its techniques, the book provides a calendar of the moon’s signs, phases and positions from 2013 to 2020. (A prior edition was published in 2002 as Guided by the Moon; both are outgrowths of the authors’ 1993 German-language book.)

A successful natural reference book and an easy-to-use planning and scheduling tool.

Pub Date: May 16, 2013

ISBN: 978-0615760148

Page Count: 300

Publisher: Wisdom Keeper Books

Review Posted Online: July 26, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2013

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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