TYRANNOSAURUS DRIP

With scansion firmly in hand, Donaldson pens a rhymed tale of dino-heroism perfectly complemented by Roberts’s comical cartoon scenes of toothy carnivores and trumpet-mouthed vegetarians. Foraging contentedly along the river (“And they hooted, ‘Up with rivers!’ and they hooted, ‘Up with reeds.’ / And they hooted, ‘Up with bellyfuls of juicy water weeds!’ ”) the duckbills feel safe from the nonswimming T. Rex clan (“And they shouted, ‘Up with hunting!’ and they shouted, ‘Up with war!’ / And they shouted, ‘Up with bellyfuls of duckbill dinosaur!’ ”) on the other side. But then a storm knocks down a well-placed tree that bridges the two banks. Fortunately, the toothy but dim predators have been fostering a stray duckbill—scornfully dubbed “Tyrannosaurus Drip” by his clueless fellow nestlings—who rises to his own species’s defense and, thanks to some quick thinking, tricks the T. Rexes into a soggy retreat. Holding firmly to the courage of his vegetarian convictions, T. Drip is definitely a dino worth hooting over. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: June 1, 2008

ISBN: 978-0-312-37747-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Feiwel & Friends

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2008

FLIP-O-STORIC

Sturdy split pages allow readers to create their own inventive combinations from among a handful of prehistoric critters. Hard on the heels of Flip-O-Saurus (2010) drops this companion gallery, printed on durable boards and offering opportunities to mix and match body thirds of eight prehistoric mammals, plus a fish and a bird, to create such portmanteau creatures as a “Gas-Lo-Therium,” or a “Mega-Tor-Don.” The “Mam-Nyc-Nia” places the head of a mammoth next to the wings and torso of an Icaronycteris (prehistoric bat) and the hind legs of a Macrauchenia (a llamalike creature with a short trunk), to amusing effect. Drehsen adds first-person captions on the versos, which will also mix and match to produce chuckles: “Do you like my nose? It’s actually a short trunk…” “I may remind you of an ostrich, because my wings aren’t built for flying…” “My tail looks like a dolphin’s.” With but ten layers to flip, young paleontologists will run through most of the permutations in just a few minutes, but Ball’s precisely detailed ink-and-watercolor portraits of each animal formally posed against plain cream colored backdrops may provide a slightly more enduring draw. A silhouette key on the front pastedown includes a pronunciation guide and indicates scale. Overall, a pleasing complement to more substantive treatments. (Novelty nonfiction. 6-8)

Pub Date: May 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-0-7892-1099-9

Page Count: 22

Publisher: Abbeville Kids

Review Posted Online: April 4, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2011

HOW DO DINOSAURS SHOW GOOD MANNERS?

From the How Do Dinosaurs…? series

Formulaic but not stale…even if it does mine previous topical material rather than expand it.

A guide to better behavior—at home, on the playground, in class, and in the library.

Serving as a sort of overview for the series’ 12 previous exercises in behavior modeling, this latest outing opens with a set of badly behaving dinos, identified in an endpaper key and also inconspicuously in situ. Per series formula, these are paired to leading questions like “Does she spit out her broccoli onto the floor? / Does he shout ‘I hate meat loaf!’ while slamming the door?” (Choruses of “NO!” from young audiences are welcome.) Midway through, the tone changes (“No, dinosaurs don’t”), and good examples follow to the tune of positive declarative sentences: “They wipe up the tables and vacuum the floors. / They share all the books and they never slam doors,” etc. Teague’s customary, humongous prehistoric crew, all depicted in exact detail and with wildly flashy coloration, fill both their spreads and their human-scale scenes as their human parents—no same-sex couples but some are racially mixed, and in one the man’s the cook—join a similarly diverse set of sibs and other children in either disapprobation or approving smiles. All in all, it’s a well-tested mix of oblique and prescriptive approaches to proper behavior as well as a lighthearted way to play up the use of “please,” “thank you,” and even “I’ll help when you’re hurt.”

Formulaic but not stale…even if it does mine previous topical material rather than expand it. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Oct. 20, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-338-36334-0

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Blue Sky/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: Aug. 17, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2020

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