OURS TO SHARE by Kari Jones

OURS TO SHARE

Co-existing in a Crowded World
From the "Orca Footprints" series
Age Range: 9 - 12
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KIRKUS REVIEW

How are 8 billion people going to share the world?

This latest title in the Orca Footprints series takes on the challenge of overpopulation. Jones (A Fair Deal, 2017) looks back at prehistory to demonstrate how the human population has grown; describes current efforts to share resources effectively; discusses the effect of the spread of human population on the natural world, including animal extinctions; and suggests actions young people can take. Her exposition is full of anecdotes from her personal life as well as recent news events. The lively design includes plentiful photographs (whose captions include their sources) and “Density Facts” in the sidebars. In her opening chapter, “Shaping the World,” she compares the numbers of humans to single drops of water, a simile that may help young readers fathom the astonishing growth in population, and shows how humans have related to animals from the beginning. “Sharing the World” talks about fair sharing among humans: clean water, acceptance of refugees, treatment of Indigenous peoples, and the importance of libraries and education. “Whose World Is This?” focuses on animal relationships, including campers who share with wolves on a Canadian island and a Maasai teen’s invention that allows his cattle-farming family to coexist with lions. “Sharing our Lives” concludes with many specific examples of young people taking action around the world.

A strongly felt and convincingly argued case for more attention to fairness in the allocation of resources. (acknowledgments, resources, glossary, index). (Nonfiction. 9-12)

Pub Date: Oct. 8th, 2019
ISBN: 978-1-4598-1634-3
Page count: 48pp
Publisher: Orca
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15th, 2019




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