Readers will take much away from this, including an appreciation for their health-care resources and a desire to make a...

READ REVIEW

MIMI'S VILLAGE

AND HOW BASIC HEALTH CARE TRANSFORMED IT

From the CitizenKid series

This entry in the CitizenKid series successfully conveys to readers both the importance of health care/disease prevention and the limited availability of these in the third world.

The fortunate good health of Mimi’s family is threatened after a forbidden sip of stream water sickens her little sister. An hour-long walk to the clinic in the next village brings improved health to Nakkissi, vaccinations to all three children and a dream to Mimi of building a clinic in their own village. Determination and cooperation pay off three months later when Nurse Tela makes the first of her bi-weekly visits to dispense health care and instruction in hygiene, nutrition and the use of bed nets to prevent malaria. Backmatter introduces readers to a real "Nurse Tela" working in Zambia, details why basic health care is so important, and gives readers ideas on how they can make a difference. Fernandes’ folk-art–style acrylic artwork is rich in patterns and beautifully portrays both village life and the Kenyan landscape. She skillfully uses the juxtaposition of foreground and background to match the illustrations with the extensive text, as when a leopard and hyena menacingly wait outside the hut where the family gathers around the ill child. 

Readers will take much away from this, including an appreciation for their health-care resources and a desire to make a difference in the world. (map, glossary) (Picture book. 6-10)

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 2012

ISBN: 978-1-55453-722-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Kids Can

Review Posted Online: April 18, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2012

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A somewhat wordy but helpful manual for children in similar situations.

SAM LOSES HIS TONSILS

A child gets his tonsils removed in Olorunfemi’s picture book.

Sam, a dark-haired, dark-skinned child, visits an Ears Nose and Throat specialist and learns that his oversized adenoids and tonsils must be removed via surgery. He is also diagnosed with sleep apnea. The book chronicles Sam’s experience leading up to his surgery including details like how he can’t eat or drink the night before. At the hospital, Sam gets hooked up to machines and receives “sleepy medicine” [8] called anesthesia. The nurses and surgeon are kind so Sam “wasn’t afraid…and was so happy he would be able to sleep better afterward.”[6] After surgery "Sam was fully awake with no... complications…and…discharged…the same day.”[8] Sam is thrilled that he no longer snores. Although his throat hurts and he can’t eat certain foods, Sam is happy to get home to his siblings and awakens feeling energized. The book functions well as a child-friendly clinical manual as opposed to a story with a plot. The author, an RN, displays clear knowledge of ENT procedures. The medical jargon and details are child-appropriate. Occasionally the text lags and includes unnecessary details like the ages of Sam’s siblings[2]. Still, this is an approachable tool for children requiring ENT procedures. The illustrations mirror the text. Some offer subtext like a scene showing masked surgeons performing Sam’s surgery. Others emphasize medical elements like a closeup of Sam’s throat and tonsils. A somewhat wordy but helpful manual for children in similar situations.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 17

Publisher: FriesenPress

Review Posted Online: April 2, 2020

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While simplistic, it’s a serviceable starter for discussions of spectrum disorders with younger neurotypical audiences.

ISAAC AND HIS AMAZING ASPERGER SUPERPOWERS!

Isaac explains why he wears a mask and cape and sometimes has special needs.

Packaged between rainbow-striped endpapers, this purposeful monologue offers a mix of positive takes—“I’ve got special superpowers that make me slightly different from my brother and the other kids at school”—and coping strategies. Among these latter are looking at foreheads rather than directly at eyes, which makes him “feel scared,” and keeping personal comments “inside my head so that I don’t upset people.” In the big, simple illustrations, Walsh gives Isaac uniformly smiling pets and peers for company, and she shows him less than cheerful only once, when the buzzing of fluorescent lights “makes my ears really hurt.” At the end he explains that he has Asperger’s, “which is a kind of autism,” and closes by affirming that his brother understands him, “and now you do too!” That may be overstating the case, but Isaac comes off as less inscrutable than the children in Gail Watts’ Kevin Thinks (2012) or Davene Fahy and Carol Inouye’s Anthony Best (2013). That the book is aimed not at children on the spectrum but at their peers is made explicit in a jacket-flap note from the author, whose son has Asperger’s.

While simplistic, it’s a serviceable starter for discussions of spectrum disorders with younger neurotypical audiences. (URL list) (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: March 22, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-7636-8121-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: Jan. 9, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2016

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