This book is clearly designed for singing, dancing, and messy crafting. It’s the best and most convivial way to experience...

READ REVIEW

MONSTER BOOGIE

With the creak of a door, a big purple monster makes its entrance and derails a perfectly good bedtime.

With big purple eyes and sharp green teeth, the monster announces to its young charges that it is the biggest monster that they’ve ever seen. But instead of gobbling them up, it turns on the radio, brings on the brightness, and proceeds to entertain the two brown children. “Everybody does the monster boogie,” after all, and the young girl mimics all of the monster’s moves while the skeptical boy taps his foot. With the spotlight on the young boy, the monster encourages both him and readers with, “So can you!” And with closed eyes and his teddy at his side, the boy begins to boogie. With amazing convenience, selected arts-and-crafts materials appear, and the children transform themselves into monsters as the big purple monster juggles all of the furniture in the room—beds, dresser, suitcase, radio, and all. Soon the room is an explosion of Day-Glo colors, filled with children and monsters jamming out. With a click of the lights and the wink of an eye, the party is over—alas, bedtime resumes. The story is written in rhythmic verse so it is impossible to read without singing…of course, you could, but what would be the fun of that?

This book is clearly designed for singing, dancing, and messy crafting. It’s the best and most convivial way to experience it. (Picture book. 3-7)

Pub Date: July 24, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-4814-6465-9

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: March 18, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2018

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Sweet, but like marshmallow chicks, just a bit of fluff.

THE LITTLEST EASTER BUNNY

From the Littlest series

The smallest bunny in Easter Town finds that she and her little chick friend are big enough to help the Easter Bunny prepare for the annual Easter egg hunt.

In the fifth entry in the Littlest series, Penny the bunny wants to help get ready for Easter. All the rabbits in her family are busy with their special jobs, getting eggs, candy, and baskets in order, but little Penny seems too small or clumsy to be of any help. Her parents and siblings try to let her assist them, but she falls into a vat of dye, spills marshmallow goo, gets tangled in the strands of a basket, and fails to fill even one Easter basket. Feeling dejected, Penny befriends a tiny chick named Peck. With the help of Penny’s family, Penny and Peck make miniature treats and petite baskets suitable to their own size. When the Easter Bunny’s main helpers fall ill, Penny and Peck convince the Easter Bunny that their small size will help them do the best job of finding spots to hide eggs as well as their own tiny basket creations. This too-pat conclusion doesn’t quite hold up to logical analysis, as the full-size eggs and baskets are still too large for Penny and Peck to handle. Bland cartoon illustrations are filled with bunnies in candy-bright pastels with a greeting-card cuteness quotient.

Sweet, but like marshmallow chicks, just a bit of fluff. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Jan. 7, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-338-32912-4

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Cartwheel/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: Dec. 8, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2020

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Love can be shared in so many ways; reading this together is a start.

LOLA DUTCH I LOVE YOU SO MUCH

Lola Dutch has many ways of communicating her love to her friends.

When each of her anthropomorphic animal friends starts the day grumpy, Lola (a human girl) knows just what to do, and readers of Gary Chapman’s popular 5 Love Languages books will recognize them. She sews cozy pajamas for chilly Gator (receiving gifts), arranges Crane’s strewn-about books in a “Book Nook” (acts of service), organizes an outing to the park for Pig (quality time), and gives Bear a hug (physical touch). In return, her four friends celebrate just how much they appreciate and love her with a banner and a cake (words of affirmation). The rear copyright page includes a small, easily overlooked paragraph citing the book’s inspiration and asking readers how they feel loved and show love to their friends. No information is given about how to determine which love language to use in different situations or with different people. The loosely outlined illustrations are a delight because of the expressive characters and Lola Dutch’s infectious exuberance. Lola is pale-skinned with a brown pageboy. The dust jacket unfolds to show a party scene, Bear and Crane preprinted on the page. Lola Dutch and Gator are paper dolls that can be cut out along with a loving note to share with someone special. Pig is absent.

Love can be shared in so many ways; reading this together is a start. (Picture book. 3-7)

Pub Date: Dec. 31, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5476-0117-2

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Bloomsbury

Review Posted Online: Oct. 9, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2019

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