An enjoyable, informative self-help book.

Discovering the It Factor within You

DISCOVERING YOUR CHARISMATIC PERSONALITY

Actress and animal activist Rowland explores the nuances of unlocking one’s charisma in order to have a richer, happier, and more fulfilled life.

According to the author, charisma is “an amalgamation of your inherent talents and the passion with which you were born.” In 23 chapters, she covers every aspect of this trait from the spiritual to the sexual to the professional, and also explores the relationship between charisma and karma—separate forces that she says an enlightened being can influence to act in tandem. She warns against the dangers of using charisma for evil, however, citing examples such as Adolf Hitler and Jim Jones, and offers numerous examples of celebrities, such as Oprah Winfrey, who have used the trait for positive effects. The book is structured well, as it presents the overall concept effortlessly and gradually delves into its nuances. When the author presents details of various energy-related healing and releasing practices, such as reiki, toward the end of the book, it feels like a logical part of a natural narrative sequence. Rowland’s story of her own tragic personal history, including the poisoning of her mother by a deranged lover and the collapse of her own romantic relationships with famous actors, is woven into the book, resulting in an unusual, inspirational tapestry. The author’s highs and lows are perhaps more dramatic than the average reader’s, but their inclusion helps propel her overall message. She shows how her life path has been about confronting tragedies, not avoiding them. By refusing to associate with toxic personalities and pursuing the path that gave her the greatest sense of well-being and purpose, she says, she’s managed to avoid the pitfalls of depression and anxiety.

An enjoyable, informative self-help book.

Pub Date: March 25, 2015

ISBN: 978-0-578-15629-3

Page Count: 242

Publisher: Kismet Publishing

Review Posted Online: July 31, 2015

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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IN MY PLACE

From the national correspondent for PBS's MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour: a moving memoir of her youth in the Deep South and her role in desegregating the Univ. of Georgia. The eldest daughter of an army chaplain, Hunter-Gault was born in what she calls the ``first of many places that I would call `my place' ''—the small village of Due West, tucked away in a remote little corner of South Carolina. While her father served in Korea, Hunter-Gault and her mother moved first to Covington, Georgia, and then to Atlanta. In ``L.A.'' (lovely Atlanta), surrounded by her loving family and a close-knit black community, the author enjoyed a happy childhood participating in activities at church and at school, where her intellectual and leadership abilities soon were noticed by both faculty and peers. In high school, Hunter-Gault found herself studying the ``comic-strip character Brenda Starr as I might have studied a journalism textbook, had there been one.'' Determined to be a journalist, she applied to several colleges—all outside of Georgia, for ``to discourage the possibility that a black student would even think of applying to one of those white schools, the state provided money for black students'' to study out of state. Accepted at Michigan's Wayne State, the author was encouraged by local civil-rights leaders to apply, along with another classmate, to the Univ. of Georgia as well. Her application became a test of changing racial attitudes, as well as of the growing strength of the civil-rights movement in the South, and Gault became a national figure as she braved an onslaught of hostilities and harassment to become the first black woman to attend the university. A remarkably generous, fair-minded account of overcoming some of the biggest, and most intractable, obstacles ever deployed by southern racists. (Photographs—not seen.)

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 1992

ISBN: 0-374-17563-2

Page Count: 192

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1992

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