Pleasant visits to wild habitats for the Oshkosh set.

READ REVIEW

ON THE MOUNTAIN

From the Nature Pop-ups series

Five types of North American animals pop up over alpine slopes and meadows.

In big, centered pop-ups that really elevate as each spread opens, a pair of wolf cubs races toward viewers, a rainbow trout gapes, a bighorn sheep lowers his head ominously, two roly-poly black bear cubs tumble, and a bald eagle soars. In the backgrounds, which, like the animal stars, are done in a cut-paper–collage style, triangular trees, bright wildflowers, and lush green grasses perch decoratively on rocky hillsides or wave sinuously in the flowing water. Walden adds bland but bouncy rhymes (“As the sun soars in the sky, / Two bumbling, tumbling bears roll by”) and, in smaller type, a few bits of natural history about each creature or about mountains in general: “The highest point of a mountain is the summit or the peak.” The co-published Across the Savannah features the same approach and the same sort of large figures (all African, notwithstanding an observation that savannahs are found on four continents), including a toothily grimacing hippo, towering giraffes, and a quartet of alert meerkats. Both galleries conclude with a final, peaceable-kingdom–style gathering.

Pleasant visits to wild habitats for the Oshkosh set. (Informational novelty. 3-6)

Pub Date: March 1, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-61067-821-6

Page Count: 12

Publisher: Kane Miller

Review Posted Online: Feb. 17, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2019

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Adults wishing to expand the worldviews of their young charges beyond Eurocentric interpretations will find plenty of visual...

RAPUNZEL

From the Once Upon a World series

A retelling of the classic fairy tale with India as its setting.

This latest addition to the Once Upon A World series tells the well-known story of the maiden with beautiful long tresses locked away in a tower by an evil witch and the prince who falls in love with her. As with Perkins’ Cinderella (illustrated by Sandra Equihua, 2016) and Snow White (illustrated by Misa Saburi, 2016), the text has been simplified for a younger audience, and the distinguishing twist here is its setting in India. The mixed-media illustrations of plants, animals, village life, and, of course, Rapunzel, the witch, and the prince come alive in warm, saturated colors. Other than the visuals, there is little to differentiate the story from traditional tellings. As always, it is still the prince who will eventually lead Rapunzel to her salvation by taking her to his kingdom far away from the witch, but that is the nature of fairy tales. The only quibble with this book and indeed with this series is the board-book format. Given the fact that the audience most likely to enjoy it is beyond the board-book age, a full-size book would have done more justice to the vibrant artwork.

Adults wishing to expand the worldviews of their young charges beyond Eurocentric interpretations will find plenty of visual delights in this one, though they’ll wish it were bigger. (Board book. 3-5)

Pub Date: March 21, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4814-9072-6

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Little Simon/Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: April 17, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2017

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Lots of detail and complex vocabulary mean most young children won’t linger past check-in at this hotel; older children will...

BUG HOTEL

Bearing the tagline “A lift-the-flap book of discovery,” this board book for older children is meant to inspire garden explorations.

Its inviting house-shaped design with multiple peep-hole windows hints at what children will find inside. The first page explains that “A bug hotel is a multistory homemade habitat where creepy crawlies of all shapes and sizes can find a place to stay!” The benefits of providing accommodations for six different garden critters are then detailed, one per double-page spread. Information about each creature’s ideal environment and how humans can foster that habitat is behind the largest flap on each spread, which also includes a cutout through which the insect can be seen. “Snails come out mainly at night, so a dark and protected habitat helps to keep them cool, happy and safe from predators….” Smaller flaps discuss characteristics of each critter—pollination for bees, metamorphosis for butterflies, etc. The final spread reviews the various materials needed to attract different bugs to the garden. However, there are no instructions included or even websites to consult to assist readers in actually constructing a bug hotel. Birdhouse, published simultaneously using the same format, is somewhat more successful, possibly because birdhouses are more common.

Lots of detail and complex vocabulary mean most young children won’t linger past check-in at this hotel; older children will still need help from a caregiver or teacher . (Board book. 4-6)

Pub Date: June 1, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-61067-766-0

Page Count: 16

Publisher: Kane Miller

Review Posted Online: June 11, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2018

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