A long ride on a dirt bike, on the mild side as often as the wild.

LOIS ON THE LOOSE

ONE WOMAN, ONE MOTORCYCLE, 20,000 MILES ACROSS THE AMERICAS

Another spunky gal takes things in hand and becomes empowered, this time astride a small Yamaha motorcycle with cell phone and e-mail ever at the ready.

Fresh from a desultory job at the BBC in London, Pryce carried on at 55 m.p.h., down the length of the Western Hemisphere from Anchorage to Tierra del Fuego. The tale of her nine-month trek has all the requisite road-trip ingredients: big bugs, bad food and lots of dirt. Indomitable Lois tells of venal bureaucrats, prepubescent border guards, good-looking biker guys and severe digestive distress. She tented in the wild Yukon and rode down the AlCan and Pacific Coast Highways, pausing for a visit with friends to a cheesy L.A. strip club. Pidgin Spanish, icky tacos and insects in the domain of Subcomandante Marcos marked the next leg of her trip, down the Pan-American Highway. Journeying through Central America, across the isthmus and on to South America, she encountered thieves, fixers and tatty digs, petty corruption and jolly drinkers. Machu Picchu, Lake Titicaca, the winds of Patagonia and all the rugged landscapes were fine settings for the cycling hijinks—and for an unpleasant companion’s nasty crash. Pryce also recalls some of the square-jawed natives along her way, including the sexy repair guys of the Andes. After a bit of pizza in the New World’s southernmost city, it’s back to London and propriety. And so we bid farewell to the rapture of the open road celebrated so cheerfully in this biker sitcom by a young woman who declares her “obsession with all things noisy, greasy and rockin’.”

A long ride on a dirt bike, on the mild side as often as the wild.

Pub Date: March 1, 2007

ISBN: 0-312-35221-2

Page Count: 288

Publisher: Dunne/St. Martin's

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2007

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

Did you like this book?

IN MY PLACE

From the national correspondent for PBS's MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour: a moving memoir of her youth in the Deep South and her role in desegregating the Univ. of Georgia. The eldest daughter of an army chaplain, Hunter-Gault was born in what she calls the ``first of many places that I would call `my place' ''—the small village of Due West, tucked away in a remote little corner of South Carolina. While her father served in Korea, Hunter-Gault and her mother moved first to Covington, Georgia, and then to Atlanta. In ``L.A.'' (lovely Atlanta), surrounded by her loving family and a close-knit black community, the author enjoyed a happy childhood participating in activities at church and at school, where her intellectual and leadership abilities soon were noticed by both faculty and peers. In high school, Hunter-Gault found herself studying the ``comic-strip character Brenda Starr as I might have studied a journalism textbook, had there been one.'' Determined to be a journalist, she applied to several colleges—all outside of Georgia, for ``to discourage the possibility that a black student would even think of applying to one of those white schools, the state provided money for black students'' to study out of state. Accepted at Michigan's Wayne State, the author was encouraged by local civil-rights leaders to apply, along with another classmate, to the Univ. of Georgia as well. Her application became a test of changing racial attitudes, as well as of the growing strength of the civil-rights movement in the South, and Gault became a national figure as she braved an onslaught of hostilities and harassment to become the first black woman to attend the university. A remarkably generous, fair-minded account of overcoming some of the biggest, and most intractable, obstacles ever deployed by southern racists. (Photographs—not seen.)

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 1992

ISBN: 0-374-17563-2

Page Count: 192

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1992

Did you like this book?

more