MITTENS

Nick welcomes his pet kitten, helping him overcome fear of his new home in this My First I Can Read entry. Skittish Mittens “zooms” behind the noisy TV, into the spooky dark under the sofa and, finally, under Nick’s bed. There, amid the clutter of toys and a wayward sock, he finds “a small place just for him.” But the kitten, still frightened, meows until Nick finds him, reassuring the pet gently until the last page’s “Purrrrrr.” Schaefer’s necessarily brief text is crisp and cogent, integrating dialogue in an accessible manner for new readers. Hartung’s simple illustrations use tones of yellow, blue, brick red and grey. Nick has a mop of curly black hair, and both he and Mittens, a tabby with white feet and chest, feature mere dots and dashes for eyes and brows. Ample white space and oversized type complete the package: a sweet, sturdy addition to the growing array of very first readers. (Easy reader. 4-6)

Pub Date: June 1, 2006

ISBN: 0-06-054659-X

Page Count: 32

Publisher: HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2006

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Should be packaged with an oxygen supply, as it will incontestably elicit uncontrollable gales of giggles.

THE DINKY DONKEY

Even more alliterative hanky-panky from the creators of The Wonky Donkey (2010).

Operating on the principle (valid, here) that anything worth doing is worth overdoing, Smith and Cowley give their wildly popular Wonky Donkey a daughter—who, being “cute and small,” was a “dinky donkey”; having “beautiful long eyelashes” she was in consequence a “blinky dinky donkey”; and so on…and on…and on until the cumulative chorus sails past silly and ludicrous to irresistibly hysterical: “She was a stinky funky plinky-plonky winky-tinky,” etc. The repeating “Hee Haw!” chorus hardly suggests what any audience’s escalating response will be. In the illustrations the daughter sports her parent’s big, shiny eyes and winsome grin while posing in a multicolored mohawk next to a rustic boombox (“She was a punky blinky”), painting her hooves pink, crossing her rear legs to signal a need to pee (“winky-tinky inky-pinky”), demonstrating her smelliness with the help of a histrionic hummingbird, and finally cozying up to her proud, evidently single parent (there’s no sign of another) for a closing cuddle.

Should be packaged with an oxygen supply, as it will incontestably elicit uncontrollable gales of giggles. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Nov. 5, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-338-60083-4

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: Oct. 13, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2019

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ISH

A lovely tale about the trials of a budding artist brought to us by the author/illustrator of Dot (2003). Ramon creates drawings at a furious pace. Everywhere he goes, he draws. But there’s nothing like a derisive older brother to put the kibosh on a sensitive artist type. Suddenly, Ramon becomes self-critical. He cannot satisfy his own desire to get things “right” anymore, so he decides to put away his pencil for good. Luckily another family member, his sister, has secretly been collecting Ramon’s art for her own private gallery. She convinces him that a successful drawing need not be a perfect reflection of reality. It’s okay if a house looks house-ish or a fish looks fish-ish. It is just the liberating sentiment Ramon needs to reignite his creativity. Told in spare prose with Reynolds’s signature line drawings in watercolor, ink, and tea, Ish will encourage other little artists. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2004

ISBN: 0-7636-2344-X

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2004

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