Like many oral folktales, the stories meander, but here the craft is also in perfect synchrony with its content: “Good...

WALKING IS A WAY OF KNOWING

IN A KADAR FOREST

A lyrical, dreamy picture storybook of five interlocking outings among the Kadar adivasi (indigenous) community in the Anamalai hills in southern India.

The Kadar tribes were historically nomadic hunter-gatherers, but 40 years ago, according to the authors’ note, they were “forced to live in small permanent settlements at the edges of [the] forests”; today, they act as guides to tourists and traders who want to traverse their lands. Researchers Ramesh and Chandi spent hours with tribal elders, and the result is this magical collection, exquisitely illustrated by Frame. The stories are mostly narrated by Madiyappan, a Kadar elder, as well as his uncle, Krishnan, and his cousin Padma. They guide the narrator, presumably an urban visitor, through a dramatic and philosophical forest walk: “Paths have character: there are easy ones, challenging ones, unforgiving ones, one that encourage you to walk with a steady swinging rhythm and other that tease your stride with odd twists and turns,” Madiyappan says. The book introduces the hills’ and forests’ flora and fauna—bison, monkeys, hornbills—and uses Indigenous words unapologetically, although many can be deciphered in context or found in the book’s short glossary.

Like many oral folktales, the stories meander, but here the craft is also in perfect synchrony with its content: “Good forest people are curious,” says Padma. “We constantly explore.” (Folktales. 8-12)

Pub Date: April 15, 2018

ISBN: 978-93-83145-60-7

Page Count: 56

Publisher: Tara Publishing

Review Posted Online: March 27, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2018

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Well-intentioned, well-researched, but awkwardly written considering the caliber of the scholar and his expected scholarship.

DARK SKY RISING

RECONSTRUCTION AND THE DAWN OF JIM CROW

From the Scholastic Focus series

“In your hands you are holding my book…my very first venture in writing for young readers,” Gates writes in a preface.

And readers can tell…though probably not in the way Gates and co-author Bolden may have aimed for. The book opens with a gripping scene of formerly enslaved African-Americans celebrating the Emancipation Proclamation. It proceeds to engagingly unfold the facts that led to Reconstruction and its reaction, Jim Crow, until it disrupts the flow with oddly placed facts about Gates’ family’s involvement in the war, name-dropping of other historians, and the occasional conspicuous exclamation (“Land! That’s what his people most hungered for”). Flourishes such as that last sit uneasily with the extensive quotations from secondary sources for adults, as if Gates and Bolden are not sure whether their conceptual audience is young readers or adults, an uncertainty established as early as Gates’ preface. They also too-frequently relegate the vital roles of black women, such as Harriet Tubman, to sidebars or scatter their facts throughout the book, implicitly framing the era as a struggle between African-American men and white men. In the end, this acts as a reminder to readers that, although a person may have a Ph.D. and have written successfully in some genres and media, that does not mean they can write in every one, even with the help of a veteran in the field.

Well-intentioned, well-researched, but awkwardly written considering the caliber of the scholar and his expected scholarship. (selected sources, endnotes, index) (Nonfiction. 8-12)

Pub Date: Jan. 29, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-338-26204-9

Page Count: 240

Publisher: Scholastic Nonfiction

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 2018

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A strong reference addition to any library.

YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

THE KIDS' GUIDE TO A BETTER PLANET

A well-designed collection of environmentally focused activism ideas that are scalable and accessible to children.

Today’s children are already on the forefront of environmental activism, increasingly aware of the dangers to planet Earth—but the problems seem so large, and they are so very small. This resource is a smartly designed catalog of ideas to make it easier for individuals to put into practice actions that can help save the planet. Divided into categories addressing topics such as plastics, clothing, food, energy, and animals, each section is filled with information and activities to help readers become more aware of wastefulness and environmental impacts. Readers will find a recipe for toothpaste, tips for a plastic-free birthday party, and instructions for starting an outdoor garden. These suggestions provide tangible ways to change mindsets about consumption. Engaging factoids lead readers to inspirational stories of children from around the world who have made a difference in areas they care about. Full-color illustrations throughout are colorful and engaging with a friendly, modern look. The book concludes with a fitting chapter on kindness, making donations, and raising awareness, making it quite possible to raise a generation of children capable of changing the world. Backmatter contains a list of the children mentioned in the book, along with contact information, as well as additional resources and organizations.

A strong reference addition to any library. (Nonfiction. 8-12)

Pub Date: Oct. 6, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-5248-6092-9

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

Review Posted Online: Aug. 18, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2020

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