A comprehensive account engagingly presented.

PALM TREES AT THE NORTH POLE

THE HOT TRUTH ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE

Earth’s climate has changed before, but science shows us that now it’s changing more quickly and with serious consequences—what can be done?

The team that produced Hey There, Earth Dweller! (2019) returns to explain “the big story of climate change.” In 10 neatly organized chapters, Horst provides historical background, describes research, discusses causes and consequences, and presents a variety of present-day and potential remedies. He refers to current debates as “squabbling” and emphasizes the point that most scientists agree there’s a problem. Each chapter begins with a summary and list of topics; a line reminding readers of the chapter subject appears along one edge of each spread. The writer addresses his young readers directly in a reassuring, conversational tone. He talks about the origin of fossil fuels, the Industrial Revolution, and bovine methane emissions. He includes a story from First Nations Australians reflecting knowledge of the sea level rise that created the Coral Sea as well as the “hockey stick” graph showing the rise in Earth’s temperature over the last thousand years. Panders’ lighthearted illustrations offset the weight of the substantial text. Sadly, the opening map wildly distorts the size of Northern Hemisphere continents and islands. All the measurements in this Canadian-published Dutch import are metric; this is appropriate in a science book, but U.S. readers unaccustomed to this world standard may find themselves confused. A mordant “climate bingo” game concludes the book.

A comprehensive account engagingly presented. (acknowledgments, index) (Nonfiction. 9-15)

Pub Date: March 30, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-77164-682-6

Page Count: 192

Publisher: Greystone Kids

Review Posted Online: Dec. 25, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2021

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Contentwise, an arbitrary assortment…but sure to draw fans of comics, of science, or of both.

FLASH FACTS

Flash, Batman, and other characters from the DC Comics universe tackle supervillains and STEM-related topics and sometimes, both.

Credited to 20 writers and illustrators in various combinations, the 10 episodes invite readers to tag along as Mera and Aquaman visit oceanic zones from epipelagic to hadalpelagic; Supergirl helps a young scholar pick a science-project topic by taking her on a tour of the solar system; and Swamp Thing lends Poison Ivy a hand to describe how DNA works (later joining Swamp Kid to scuttle a climate-altering scheme by Arcane). In other episodes, various costumed creations explain the ins and outs of diverse large- and small-scale phenomena, including electricity, atomic structure, forensic techniques, 3-D printing, and the lactate threshold. Presumably on the supposition that the characters will be more familiar to readers than the science, the minilectures tend to start from simple basics, but the figures are mostly both redrawn to look more childlike than in the comics and identified only in passing. Drawing styles and page designs differ from chapter to chapter but not enough to interrupt overall visual unity and flow—and the cast is sufficiently diverse to include roles for superheroes (and villains) of color like Cyborg, Kid Flash, and the Latina Green Lantern, Jessica Cruz. Appended lists of websites and science-based YouTube channels, plus instructions for homespun activities related to each episode, point inspired STEM-winders toward further discoveries.

Contentwise, an arbitrary assortment…but sure to draw fans of comics, of science, or of both. (Graphic nonfiction. 9-12)

Pub Date: Feb. 2, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-77950-382-4

Page Count: 160

Publisher: DC

Review Posted Online: Jan. 13, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2021

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Wordplay and wry wit put extra fun into a trove of fundamental knowledge.

BILL NYE'S GREAT BIG WORLD OF SCIENCE

With an amped-up sense of wonder, the Science Guy surveys the natural universe.

Starting from first principles like the scientific method, Nye and his co-author marvel at the “Amazing Machine” that is the human body then go on to talk up animals, plants, evolution, physics and chemistry, the quantum realm, geophysics, and climate change. They next venture out into the solar system and beyond. Along with tallying select aspects and discoveries in each chapter, the authors gather up “Massively Important” central concepts, send shoutouts to underrecognized women scientists like oceanographer Marie Tharp, and slip in directions for homespun experiments and demonstrations. They also challenge readers to ponder still-unsolved scientific posers and intersperse rousing quotes from working scientists about how exciting and wide open their respective fields are. If a few of those fields, like the fungal kingdom, get short shrift (one spare paragraph notwithstanding), readers are urged often enough to go look things up for themselves to kindle a compensatory habit. Aside from posed photos of Nye and a few more of children (mostly presenting as White) doing science-y things, the full-color graphic and photographic images not only reflect the overall “get this!” tone but consistently enrich the flow of facts and reflections. “Our universe is a strange and surprising place,” Nye writes. “Stay curious.” Words to live by.

Wordplay and wry wit put extra fun into a trove of fundamental knowledge. (contributors, art credits, selected bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 11-15)

Pub Date: Oct. 27, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-4197-4676-5

Page Count: 264

Publisher: Abrams

Review Posted Online: Aug. 25, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2020

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