Young children and their dogs will enjoy this cheery tale.

READ REVIEW

HELLO GOODBYE DOG

A mixed-race girl who uses a manual wheelchair finds a way for her irrepressible pet to stay by her side.

Zara’s dog, Moose, loves to say, “Hello.” When Zara hugs Moose, the faces of both child and dog beaming with contentment, readers will understand perfectly why Moose finds “goodbye” as awful as “an itch that couldn’t be scratched.” When Moose can’t accompany Zara to school, Moose “put[s] on her brakes” until Mom (who’s black) and Dad (who’s white) drag her away from Zara. But Moose has other ideas, beginning a chain of escape attempts. Each “Hello” finds the persistent pooch visiting Zara’s class in different areas of the school, her animated antics emphasized by brisk lines and scrawls. Each “Goodbye” is a cumulative refrain, requiring Mom, Dad, Zara, and more and more school personnel to get Moose to leave. Finally, Moose is alone in a crate, surrounded by white space broken only by a family portrait and Moose’s winding howl. But not for long—Zara takes Moose to “therapy dog school,” and Moose happily becomes the class reading dog. Gianferrari’s dog’s-eye metaphors for loneliness and Barton’s expressive, energetic mixed-media illustrations highlight Moose’s affection and the joy she brings to others. An author’s note provides a brief description of therapy dogs as well as two websites for further information.

Young children and their dogs will enjoy this cheery tale. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: July 25, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-62672-177-7

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Roaring Brook

Review Posted Online: April 17, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2017

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Should be packaged with an oxygen supply, as it will incontestably elicit uncontrollable gales of giggles.

THE DINKY DONKEY

Even more alliterative hanky-panky from the creators of The Wonky Donkey (2010).

Operating on the principle (valid, here) that anything worth doing is worth overdoing, Smith and Cowley give their wildly popular Wonky Donkey a daughter—who, being “cute and small,” was a “dinky donkey”; having “beautiful long eyelashes” she was in consequence a “blinky dinky donkey”; and so on…and on…and on until the cumulative chorus sails past silly and ludicrous to irresistibly hysterical: “She was a stinky funky plinky-plonky winky-tinky,” etc. The repeating “Hee Haw!” chorus hardly suggests what any audience’s escalating response will be. In the illustrations the daughter sports her parent’s big, shiny eyes and winsome grin while posing in a multicolored mohawk next to a rustic boombox (“She was a punky blinky”), painting her hooves pink, crossing her rear legs to signal a need to pee (“winky-tinky inky-pinky”), demonstrating her smelliness with the help of a histrionic hummingbird, and finally cozying up to her proud, evidently single parent (there’s no sign of another) for a closing cuddle.

Should be packaged with an oxygen supply, as it will incontestably elicit uncontrollable gales of giggles. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Nov. 5, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-338-60083-4

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: Oct. 13, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2019

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Take strength from the dreamers before you and follow your dreams. Or maybe just roll the dice.

LITTLE JOE CHICKAPIG

Is it a book about aspirations or the backstory for the board game?

Chickapig is defined as “an animal hybrid that is half-chicken and half-pig” and is depicted in yellow, two-legged chick shape with pink pig snout and ears. Young Joe Chickapig lives on a farm that was his grandfather’s dream, but it’s getting Joe down. He dreams of adventure but needs the “courage to follow his heart. / But how could he do it? How could he start?” In a bedtime story, Joe’s mother shares the influential characters that helped Joe’s sailor grandfather “follow his heart against the tide.” It seems that “Grandpa had heard a story told / Of a great big bear who broke the mold. / The bear was tired of striking fear”—so he became a forest doctor and a friend to all. And the bear’s inspiration? “A mouse who went to space.” The mouse, in turn, found hope in a “fierce young dragon” who joined a rock band. And coming full circle, the dragon found courage from a Chickapig warrior who “tired of shields and swords to wield” and established a farm. Chickapig game fans will appreciate this fanciful rhyming tale illustrated in attention-grabbing colors, but readers coming to it cold will note a distinct absence of plot. Mouse and dragon present female; all others are male.

Take strength from the dreamers before you and follow your dreams. Or maybe just roll the dice. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Jan. 14, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-7944-4452-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Printers Row

Review Posted Online: Oct. 9, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2019

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