BUNION BURT

There’s no lack of advice for this poor little boy. Bunion Burt, readers are told in tightly rhyming verse, has “feet that hurt. / They pinched and poked and pained him. / The folks all knew / ’Bout Burt’s feet too— / His bunions had nicknamed him.” Everyone in his life has a cure. Mama Myrt gives him Goop for the Feet, to little effect. Burt passes up a big wedge of cake to roam the family farm in search of a solution. The sweet sow Pert recommends a wallow in the mud, Grandma Gert orders a bath and Cousin Kurt says the sun can cure Burt’s bunions. As depicted in Davis’s appealingly quirky watercolor-and-acrylic illustrations, none of these remedies helps. Burt also tries ice and toenail polish (this last courtesy of cute sister Vert) to no avail. It takes Pappy Spurt to come up with the happy solution that young listeners will likely already have thought of. A bouncy rib-tickler, best for preschoolers. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Nov. 10, 2009

ISBN: 978-1-4169-4132-3

Page Count: 32

Publisher: McElderry

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2009

GREEN IS FOR CHRISTMAS

Fun enough to read once but without enough substance to last.

Familiar crayon characters argue over which color is the essential Christmas color.

Green starts by saying that green is for Christmas. After all, green is for holly. But Red objects. Red is for candy canes. Green is for fir trees, Green retorts. But Red is for Santa Claus, who agrees. (Santa is depicted as a white-bearded White man.) Then White joins the fray. After spending the year being invisible, White isn’t giving up the distinction of association with Christmas. Snow, anyone? But then there’s Silver: stars and bells. And Brown: cookies and reindeer! At this point, everyone is confused. But they come together and agree that Christmas wouldn’t be Christmas without all of them together. Someone may get the last word, though. In Daywalt and Jeffers’ now-signature style, the crayon-written text is spare and humorous, while the crayon characters engage with each other against a bare white background, vying for attention. Dot-eyed faces and stick legs on each object turn them all into comical, if similar, personalities. But the series’ original cleverness is absent here, leaving readers with a perfunctory recitation of attributes. Fans of the crayon books may delight in another themed installment; those who aren’t already fans will likely find it lacking. (This book was reviewed digitally.)

Fun enough to read once but without enough substance to last. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Oct. 19, 2021

ISBN: 978-0-593-35338-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Philomel

Review Posted Online: Aug. 17, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2021

TEN LITTLE FISH

This charming, colorful counting tale of ten little fish runs full-circle. Although the light verse opens and closes with ten fish swimming in a line, page-by-page the line grows shorter as the number of fish diminishes one-by-one. One fish dives down, one gets lost, one hides, and another takes a nap until a single fish remains. Then along comes another fish to form a couple and suddenly a new family of little fish emerges to begin all over. Slick, digitally-created images of brilliant marine flora and fauna give an illusion of underwater depth and silence enhancing the verse’s numerical and theatrical progression. The holistic story bubbles with life’s endless cycle. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2004

ISBN: 0-439-63569-1

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Blue Sky/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2004

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