A quick, welcoming read full of infectiously positive retirement advice from a man enjoying it.

"I Know Better"

CURMUDGEON PRESCRIBED RETIREMENT

As much an anecdotal meditation as an instructional guide, Dorenbush’s (Senior Online Dating, 2013) follow-up to his first book is a sensible, contagiously delightful look at the golden years.

After past events, including his wife’s death, had left him depressed, Dorenbush is now determinedly “grateful for any day above ground.” Writing primarily for his generation (he’s now in his 80s) and those lucky enough to have jobs with retirement provisions, he offers sound general financial advice: “An intelligent curmudgeon should not plan to burn through savings and income in just a few years.” Stay stimulated, he says; read the news; learn about computers, email and the Internet (“discard the old Encyclopedia Britannica”). Sly jokes abound, as does kind yet prickly sarcasm: “Should you still have the physical wherewithal for coping with print media, do it in front of the younger generation. They will be amazed at how clever you once were.” Retirement takes creativity, but it doesn’t mean hastening toward death. Consider the free time as a gift, he writes; don’t let it terrify you. Travel early in retirement, since mobility will decline. “If finances permit, try to fly business or first class,” he says. “As a curmudgeon, I tell you that if you do not, your heirs will.” Dorenbush often turns his wry sense of humor on himself, as when he crashed trying to revitalize his roller skating skills. “Relying on [his] keen sense of senior intellect,” he stopped. In addition to standard advice to the aging—stay busy (like sharks, we must keep moving), meet new people, learn something new (in his case, ballroom dancing), eat healthfully—there are also sartorial tips: A “spotted tie” signals a depressed senior, for instance. “You are above ground, the future still exists, although markedly changed,” he writes. Above all, live.

A quick, welcoming read full of infectiously positive retirement advice from a man enjoying it.

Pub Date: April 17, 2014

ISBN: 978-1495248702

Page Count: 70

Publisher: CreateSpace

Review Posted Online: July 3, 2014

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Doyle offers another lucid, inspiring chronicle of female empowerment and the rewards of self-awareness and renewal.

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UNTAMED

More life reflections from the bestselling author on themes of societal captivity and the catharsis of personal freedom.

In her third book, Doyle (Love Warrior, 2016, etc.) begins with a life-changing event. “Four years ago,” she writes, “married to the father of my three children, I fell in love with a woman.” That woman, Abby Wambach, would become her wife. Emblematically arranged into three sections—“Caged,” “Keys,” “Freedom”—the narrative offers, among other elements, vignettes about the soulful author’s girlhood, when she was bulimic and felt like a zoo animal, a “caged girl made for wide-open skies.” She followed the path that seemed right and appropriate based on her Catholic upbringing and adolescent conditioning. After a downward spiral into “drinking, drugging, and purging,” Doyle found sobriety and the authentic self she’d been suppressing. Still, there was trouble: Straining an already troubled marriage was her husband’s infidelity, which eventually led to life-altering choices and the discovery of a love she’d never experienced before. Throughout the book, Doyle remains open and candid, whether she’s admitting to rigging a high school homecoming court election or denouncing the doting perfectionism of “cream cheese parenting,” which is about “giving your children the best of everything.” The author’s fears and concerns are often mirrored by real-world issues: gender roles and bias, white privilege, racism, and religion-fueled homophobia and hypocrisy. Some stories merely skim the surface of larger issues, but Doyle revisits them in later sections and digs deeper, using friends and familial references to personify their impact on her life, both past and present. Shorter pieces, some only a page in length, manage to effectively translate an emotional gut punch, as when Doyle’s therapist called her blooming extramarital lesbian love a “dangerous distraction.” Ultimately, the narrative is an in-depth look at a courageous woman eager to share the wealth of her experiences by embracing vulnerability and reclaiming her inner strength and resiliency.

Doyle offers another lucid, inspiring chronicle of female empowerment and the rewards of self-awareness and renewal.

Pub Date: March 10, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-9848-0125-8

Page Count: 352

Publisher: Dial Books

Review Posted Online: Dec. 22, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2020

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Clever and accessibly conversational, Manson reminds us to chill out, not sweat the small stuff, and keep hope for a better...

EVERYTHING IS F*CKED

A BOOK ABOUT HOPE

The popular blogger and author delivers an entertaining and thought-provoking third book about the importance of being hopeful in terrible times.

“We are a culture and a people in need of hope,” writes Manson (The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life, 2016, etc.). With an appealing combination of gritty humor and straightforward prose, the author floats the idea of drawing strength and hope from a myriad of sources in order to tolerate the “incomprehensibility of your existence.” He broadens and illuminates his concepts through a series of hypothetical scenarios based in contemporary reality. At the dark heart of Manson’s guide is the “Uncomfortable Truth,” which reiterates our cosmic insignificance and the inevitability of death, whether we blindly ignore or blissfully embrace it. The author establishes this harsh sentiment early on, creating a firm foundation for examining the current crisis of hope, how we got here, and what it means on a larger scale. Manson’s referential text probes the heroism of Auschwitz infiltrator Witold Pilecki and the work of Isaac Newton, Nietzsche, Einstein, and Immanuel Kant, as the author explores the mechanics of how hope is created and maintained through self-control and community. Though Manson takes many serpentine intellectual detours, his dark-humored wit and blunt prose are both informative and engaging. He is at his most convincing in his discussions about the fallibility of religious beliefs, the modern world’s numerous shortcomings, deliberations over the “Feeling Brain” versus the “Thinking Brain,” and the importance of striking a happy medium between overindulging in and repressing emotions. Although we live in a “couch-potato-pundit era of tweetstorms and outrage porn,” writes Manson, hope springs eternal through the magic salves of self-awareness, rational thinking, and even pain, which is “at the heart of all emotion.”

Clever and accessibly conversational, Manson reminds us to chill out, not sweat the small stuff, and keep hope for a better world alive.

Pub Date: May 14, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-06-288843-3

Page Count: 288

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: April 1, 2019

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