Manteghi weaves together her diverse international life experiences to create an insightful, lively self-portrait.

The Street of Good Fortune

In Manteghi’s memoir, she reflects with compassion and humor on her year spent as a 34-year-old battling breast cancer, interspersing memories of her childhood as an Iranian in Canada and her pre-cancer years in Bosnia.

Manteghi, unlike many of her peers, didn’t spend her early 30s planning the perfect domestic family life. Having immigrated to Canada from Iran as a young child, Manteghi never felt wholly in sync with her Toronto home or Canadian peers. After graduating from law school, Manteghi pursued adventure abroad as an activist in Bosnia. There, she found a home as she developed deep connections with the people, philanthropic interests and a romantic relationship. Her breast cancer diagnosis ended all of that. Manteghi returned to Toronto, spending a year in chemotherapy. With humor, she examines her experience, stating that she had replaced her idolization of Christiane Amanpour with Kylie Minogue as she channeled the “KylieChemo look.” In more serious moments, she realized that the family life she’d assumed would happen might not. The experience changed her. The narrative is initially a little confusing; the chronology isn’t linear, and the reader may wonder why Manteghi was in Bosnia, for example. For the reader not well-versed in Bosnian or Iranian history, a brief introduction of the countries’ histories would have been helpful. As the narrative progresses, however, the reader becomes more familiar with Manteghi’s personal history, and the nonlinearity of the stories becomes easier to follow. Manteghi’s choosing among career ambition, romance and family may be particularly interesting for other young people faced with similar decisions.

Manteghi weaves together her diverse international life experiences to create an insightful, lively self-portrait.

Pub Date: April 7, 2014

ISBN: 978-0615970714

Page Count: 210

Publisher: Forefront Media Group

Review Posted Online: June 19, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2014

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

Did you like this book?

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. AND THE MARCH ON WASHINGTON

This early reader is an excellent introduction to the March on Washington in 1963 and the important role in the march played by Martin Luther King Jr. Ruffin gives the book a good, dramatic start: “August 28, 1963. It is a hot summer day in Washington, D.C. More than 250,00 people are pouring into the city.” They have come to protest the treatment of African-Americans here in the US. With stirring original artwork mixed with photographs of the events (and the segregationist policies in the South, such as separate drinking fountains and entrances to public buildings), Ruffin writes of how an end to slavery didn’t mark true equality and that these rights had to be fought for—through marches and sit-ins and words, particularly those of Dr. King, and particularly on that fateful day in Washington. Within a year the Civil Rights Act of 1964 had been passed: “It does not change everything. But it is a beginning.” Lots of visual cues will help new readers through the fairly simple text, but it is the power of the story that will keep them turning the pages. (Easy reader. 6-8)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 2001

ISBN: 0-448-42421-5

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Grosset & Dunlap

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2000

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more