A rough but affecting account of an Apache’s love for his son.

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QUINNY

THE ASTONISHING STORY OF A FATHER'S LOVE FOR HIS SON

A debut true crime book tells the story of a sudden murder that changes the lives of a Native American father and son.

“Native American Apache legends pass down from father-to-son across centuries,” Hutcheson begins ominously. “Of all those teachings, traditions, and legends, the ‘Legend of the Woman’ is the one they fear the most. Her presence means someone is about to die.” According to the author, there was a beautiful Apache woman sitting in the back seat of the truck as Frank “Wakado” Banashley and his son, Quinten, drove around the vicinity of Hawley Lake in Whiteriver, Arizona, on Dec. 8, 1999. Wakado—who had recently started drinking again after 16 years and whose marriage to Quinny’s mother was quickly falling apart—didn’t want his son to steal snacks from the local convenience store when they find it empty with its door ajar, but he didn’t stop the 17-year-old from doing so. A little while later, they were pulled over by Apache Reservation Police Department Officer Tenny Gatewood, a friend of Wakado’s from boyhood. Despite their friendship, over the course of the interaction both Wakado and Tenny were shot—the latter fatally. For this, Wakado was sentenced to 42 years for second-degree murder. It was inside the prison that he met Hutcheson, a fellow inmate, and decided to tell him what happened that fateful day as well as in the years before and after. It is the stirring story of a man who would do anything for his family, especially his son. The author’s prose tells the tale from Wakado’s perspective, summoning the man’s emotional trauma with stark images: “Deep in Wakado’s soul, those wounds remained suppressed for two decades, and the time had come for them to be free. The small emotional moment with” a faithful friend “caused a seismic event in Wakado that allowed his secret to ooze to the surface like hot magma.” Hutcheson does his best to give the story an intriguing shape, jumping back and forth through time and ending chapters with cliffhangers. Even so, the book reads like it was written by a friend of Wakado’s in terms of its sympathies.

A rough but affecting account of an Apache’s love for his son.

Pub Date: Jan. 14, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-72716-051-2

Page Count: 167

Publisher: CreateSpace

Review Posted Online: March 13, 2019

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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