THE UNDERSIDE OF THE LEAF

In clinically affectless prose, the pubescent daydreams of twelve-year-old Paula as she passes a summer on the lake painting watercolors, designing clothes for paper dolls, and imagining that Tom Kadrie, her neighbor's jazz musician boyfriend, is secretly in love with her. Five years later, when she's in New York for a weekend, Paula calls Tom (who hardly remembers her) and makes a date. His seedy apartment, his sexual expectations, his ineffectually half-hearted friendliness all intrude on her carefully cultivated fantasies, but there's none of the morally uplifting, psychologically improbable instant maturity so common in teenage fiction. Paula's unenviable innocence remains intact, and on the plane out of New York we see her interest beginning to shift to the Princeton student sitting in front of her. The illusions and vulnerability of adolescence are depicted with an unflinching accuracy, and young women will find this a moving and sensitive examination of the painful side of growing up.

Pub Date: April 1, 1972

ISBN: 0440988535

Page Count: -

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Review Posted Online: April 27, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1972

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Playful, engaging, and full of opportunities for empathy—a raucous storytime hit.

THERE'S A MONSTER IN YOUR BOOK

From the There’s a…in Your Book series

Readers try to dislodge a monster from the pages of this emotive and interactive read-aloud.

“OH NO!” the story starts. “There’s a monster in your book!” The blue, round-headed monster with pink horns and a pink-tipped tail can be seen cheerfully munching on the opening page. “Let’s try to get him out,” declares the narrator. Readers are encouraged to shake, tilt, and spin the book around, while the monster careens around an empty background looking scared and lost. Viewers are exhorted to tickle the monster’s feet, blow on the page, and make a really loud noise. Finally, shockingly, it works: “Now he’s in your room!” But clearly a monster in your book is safer than a monster in your room, so he’s coaxed back into the illustrations and lulled to sleep, curled up under one page and cuddling a bit of another like a child with their blankie. The monster’s entirely cute appearance and clear emotional reactions to his treatment add to the interactive aspect, and some young readers might even resist the instructions to avoid hurting their new pal. Children will be brought along on the monster’s journey, going from excited, noisy, and wiggly to calm and steady (one can hope).

Playful, engaging, and full of opportunities for empathy—a raucous storytime hit. (Picture book. 2-7)

Pub Date: Sept. 5, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-5247-6456-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: June 5, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2017

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CINDERELLA

This companion piece to the other fairy tales Marcia Brown has interpreted (see Puss In Boots, 1952, p. 548 and others) has the smoothness of a good translation and a unique charm to her feathery light pictures. The pictures have been done in sunset colors and the spreads on each page as they illustrate the story have the cumulative effect of soft cloud banks. Gentle.

Pub Date: June 15, 1954

ISBN: 0684126761

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Scribner

Review Posted Online: Oct. 26, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1954

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