Less pathological than Love You Forever but aimed at the same audience.

READ REVIEW

ONE MORE HUG

The reassurance of “one more hug” allows a little boy to take on fears, new challenges, and responsibilities as he grows into an older boy, adolescent, and finally young man.

Graceful gouache paintings delineate a child’s progress, from coping with the fear of a storm and a broken toy through the first time on a school bus, growing older and learning to climb a tree, ride a bike, play soccer, training with the track team, and, ultimately, driving away to life on his own. All the while, Mama is there to provide support and love, always with a special hug. Related in the past tense by Mama, the narrative reflects a nostalgic remembrance yet conveys the constant unbreakable bond between mother and child. “But even though you were older, you were still my boy. And you asked for… // one more hug before your big performance.” In a final sentimental reflection, Mama wonders if her now-adult son understands her pride and love for him and is happily rewarded with a surprise visit and “one more hug.” Children will enjoy reviewing the relatable illustrations of a growing child’s activities; however, it’s parents who will undoubtedly identify with the emotions. According to the author’s note, the intent is to assure parents that sons should be allowed to express their feelings. Both Mama and son are white.

Less pathological than Love You Forever but aimed at the same audience. (Picture book. 5-10)

Pub Date: Nov. 12, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5344-2971-0

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Aladdin

Review Posted Online: July 14, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2019

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The buoyant uplift seems a bit pre-packaged but spot-on nonetheless.

THE WORLD NEEDS MORE PURPLE PEOPLE

A monohued tally of positive character traits.

Purple is a “magic color,” affirm the authors (both actors, though Hart’s name recognition is nowhere near the level of Bell’s), and “purple people” are the sort who ask questions, laugh wholeheartedly, work hard, freely voice feelings and opinions, help those who might “lose” their own voices in the face of unkindness, and, in sum, can “JUST BE (the real) YOU.” Unlike the obsessive protagonist of Victoria Kann’s Pinkalicious franchise, being a purple person has “nothing to do with what you look like”—a point that Wiseman underscores with scenes of exuberantly posed cartoon figures (including versions of the authors) in casual North American attire but sporting a wide range of ages, skin hues, and body types. A crowded playground at the close (no social distancing here) displays all this wholesome behavior in action. Plenty of purple highlights, plus a plethora of broad smiles and wide-open mouths, crank up the visual energy—and if the earnest overall tone doesn’t snag the attention of young audiences, a grossly literal view of the young narrator and a grandparent “snot-out-our-nose laughing” should do the trick. (This book was reviewed digitally with 10.4-by-20.6-inch double-page spreads viewed at 22.2% of actual size.)

The buoyant uplift seems a bit pre-packaged but spot-on nonetheless. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: June 2, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-593-12196-2

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: June 3, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2020

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A fitting farewell, still funny, acute, and positive in its view of human nature even in its 37th episode.

HORRIBLE HARRY SAYS GOODBYE

From the Horrible Harry series , Vol. 37

A long-running series reaches its closing chapters.

Having, as Kline notes in her warm valedictory acknowledgements, taken 30 years to get through second and third grade, Harry Spooger is overdue to move on—but not just into fourth grade, it turns out, as his family is moving to another town as soon as the school year ends. The news leaves his best friend, narrator “Dougo,” devastated…particularly as Harry doesn’t seem all that fussed about it. With series fans in mind, the author takes Harry through a sort of last-day-of-school farewell tour. From his desk he pulls a burned hot dog and other items that featured in past episodes, says goodbye to Song Lee and other classmates, and even (for the first time ever) leads Doug and readers into his house and memento-strewn room for further reminiscing. Of course, Harry isn’t as blasé about the move as he pretends, and eyes aren’t exactly dry when he departs. But hardly is he out of sight before Doug is meeting Mohammad, a new neighbor from Syria who (along with further diversifying a cast that began as mostly white but has become increasingly multiethnic over the years) will also be starting fourth grade at summer’s end, and planning a written account of his “horrible” buddy’s exploits. Finished illustrations not seen.

A fitting farewell, still funny, acute, and positive in its view of human nature even in its 37th episode. (Fiction. 7-9)

Pub Date: Nov. 27, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-451-47963-1

Page Count: 80

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: Sept. 17, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2018

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