An excellent resource for parents attempting to wrangle their little superheroes’ powers for good.

READ REVIEW

GOOD MORNING, SUPERMAN!

From the DC Super Heroes series

Superman greets a new day.

The sun has risen on the city of Metropolis, and Superman is ready for a new day. An unnamed black boy prepares for his day as well, and the illustrations juxtapose the Man of Steel and his young fan as they go about their morning routines. Faster than a speeding locomotive, the heroes get dressed, gather their strength, and greet the day with heads held high. The illustrations use the angular Superman characters modeled by Bruce Timm in Superman: The Animated Series for the panels featuring the Man of Tomorrow and employ a rounded approach for scenes involving his young counterpart. Lex Luthor, Supergirl, and Krypto make appearances. While young readers might find it puzzling that the young protagonist seems to be afraid of brushing his teeth, they will appreciate the parallelism as he spits into the sink and Superman uses his superbreath to fight crime. This quick read includes a Morning Checklist for little readers who may forget a thing or two in their morning routines. Little ones that adore the Last Son of Krypton will go gaga for this quickly paced, brightly colored, action-packed read.

An excellent resource for parents attempting to wrangle their little superheroes’ powers for good. (Picture book. 2-5)

Pub Date: March 1, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-62370-850-4

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Capstone Young Readers

Review Posted Online: Dec. 6, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2016

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A visual feast for families interested in seeing the Native world through small, kind deeds.

WHEN WE ARE KIND

Distinctive illustrations amplify a pointed moral lesson in this Native picture book for kids.

An intergenerational Native family sits in a drum circle on the cover, suggesting the importance of cooperation and community that’s elucidated in the pages that follow. What does it mean to be kind to your family, your elders, your environment, and yourself? In simple, repetitive language, Smith (who is of mixed Cree, Lakota, and Scottish heritage) explores how our behaving with generosity toward others makes us feel happy in return. By helping with laundry, walking the family dog, sharing with friends, and taking food to our elders, we learn that the gift of kindness involves giving and receiving. The first half of the book is constructed entirely on the phrase “I am kind when,” while the second half uses “I feel.” Strung together, the simple statements have the resonance of affirmations and establish a clear chain of connectedness, but there is no story arc in the conventional sense. What the book lacks in plot, it makes up for with its illustrations. Drawing on her mother’s Diné traditions, Neidhardt prominently features Navajo hair buns, moccasins, and baskets; a panoply of Indigenous characters—including one child who uses a wheelchair—is featured in rich detail. A French edition, translated by Rachel Martinez, publishes simultaneously.

A visual feast for families interested in seeing the Native world through small, kind deeds. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: Sept. 15, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-4598-2522-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Orca

Review Posted Online: June 30, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2020

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This may turn the dreaded morning routine into a game, and what could be more welcome than that? (Board book. 2-5)

HAVE YOU SEEN MY LUNCH BOX?

A getting-ready-for-school book for little ones who are learning their colors.

A pink-cheeked white boy is getting ready for school in the morning, but he needs readers’ help in finding something in each spread. On the verso is the spare text. “Time for school. Where are my socks?” The background of this page is pink, the same color as the socks readers are trying to spy. Black-and-white ink drawings fill the recto pages with scenes inside the boy’s house, outside his brownstone, and on the sidewalk waiting for the school bus, the item being sought the only spot of color. The boy’s family includes a dad in a shirt and tie, a little sister, and a mother with a ponytail and a skirt. The final page lists all eight items and their colors, including a crayon, a robot, a pencil case, a ball, a book, some marbles, and a lunch box. The colors include red through blue, purple, pink, and teal. Light’s illustrations are filled with lots of details—enough to make spotting each colored object something of a challenge—and adults sharing this with toddlers can easily give them more items to find, match, and count and thereby extend the fun.

This may turn the dreaded morning routine into a game, and what could be more welcome than that? (Board book. 2-5)

Pub Date: June 13, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-7636-9068-7

Page Count: 18

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: May 24, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2017

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