An often inspiring account that should find a solid fan base, especially among those interested in the teachings of...

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Learning to Walk in India

A LOVE STORY

A debut memoir detailing the author’s struggle to regain physical health and find internal peace during an arduous trip through India.

In January 2007, just a few days after her new husband, Dan, had returned to the United States, the then-32-year-old Brown found herself in a Mumbai hospital, suffering from inflammation in her knees that left her in excruciating pain and unable to walk. The plan had been for the couple to spend one month together in India on their honeymoon, and then Brown would continue on for several months “to do whatever it was [she] needed to do in India.” It was a spiritual trip, inspired by meditation, which she’d been planning before she met Dan. Although the book is, in part, an evocative travelogue (“Wherever you go in India, there always seems to be smoke in the air, the smoke of meals being cooked on a fire, of cumin and coriander and curry and turmeric egesting from their earthen shells into a man-made creation”), the bulk of the text is devoted to Brown’s personal physical, emotional, and spiritual journey. Although it’s a bit preachy and repetitive, it’s nonetheless a touching chronicle, peppered with humor and raw honesty. Back home, Brown was a nurse, but after severe bouts with dysentery resulted in the swelling in her knees, she says that she was alone and frightened, finding herself, for the first time, totally dependent on the kindness of strangers—including a cab driver, a young woman with the American Civil Services Unit at the American Embassy, and the health care workers and professionals at the hospital. After a few days, an American friend, Ashley, also traveling through India, arrived at her bedside and moved right into her hospital room, providing cheer, sustenance, and, happily, Percocet for the pain. Over the course of the book, Brown relates how she learned to take one step at a time, ever so slowly, and to open herself to accepting the experience, appreciating the moment, and surrendering to what is.

An often inspiring account that should find a solid fan base, especially among those interested in the teachings of mindfulness. 

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: 978-0-9966166-0-7

Page Count: 218

Publisher: CreateSpace

Review Posted Online: May 27, 2016

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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