THE MAN WHO LISTENS TO HORSES by Monty Roberts

THE MAN WHO LISTENS TO HORSES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

 The surprisingly complex and lively memoir of a successful and influential horse trainer who helped pioneer nonviolent methods of breaking horses in. Some of the book's vigor and pace may have to do with the fact that Lucy Grealy (Autobiography of a Face, 1994) is the coauthor. The narrative begins in 1948 when Roberts, then 13, spent time studying wild horses in the Nevada desert. He applied what he learned there to radically new ideas about how wild horses could be trained and came to be an important figure in horse racing circles. His portrait of the business of breeding and training horses is frank and fascinating, but the book's most memorable passages cover the rodeos and horse business in the west as it was in the author's youth, and include a haunting portrait of his violent, racist father and of some of the other remarkable figures Roberts knew (including a young James Dean). Over and above everything, though, is Roberts's surpassing love for horses, captured here in his evocations of the horses he has trained over a career spanning four decades. (Author tour)

Pub Date: Aug. 18th, 1997
ISBN: 0-679-45658-9
Page count: 304pp
Publisher: Random House
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15th, 1997




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