For the trilogy's fans only.

THE BETRAYAL OF THE LIVING

From the Blood Ninja series , Vol. 3

Meditating after destroying Lord Oda, vampire ninja Taro embarks on a quest to slay a dragon that has been troubling the city of Edo, home of the shogun.

Dragons are not the only troubles ravaging Japan; droughts and rice shortages have killed many peasants, and the dead have been returning in greater numbers and hungrier than ever before. As Taro searches for the legendary sword Kusanagi, he must also confront his father, Lord Tokugawa—and he must make sacrifices of his closest friends. Riddled with flashbacks, side narratives and more lore than ever before, Lake’s third entry in the Blood Ninja series surpasses the bloated Revenge of Lord Oda (2010) in slow pacing and needless exposition. Previously significant characters are reduced to cameo appearances in order to make space for complicated mythology lectures, recounts of past battles and those characters’ own backstories. Brief moments of tension build around Taro and Hana’s complex relationship, but there’s little drama anywhere else. Attempting to wrap up all possible plots instead results in an unwieldy soap opera with none of the ninja action and excitement the first volume promised.

For the trilogy's fans only. (Horror. 12 & up)

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-1-4424-2679-5

Page Count: 368

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: June 20, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2012

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Engrossing, contemplative, and as heart-wrenching as the title promises.

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THEY BOTH DIE AT THE END

What would you do with one day left to live?

In an alternate present, a company named Death-Cast calls Deckers—people who will die within the coming day—to inform them of their impending deaths, though not how they will happen. The End Day call comes for two teenagers living in New York City: Puerto Rican Mateo and bisexual Cuban-American foster kid Rufus. Rufus needs company after a violent act puts cops on his tail and lands his friends in jail; Mateo wants someone to push him past his comfort zone after a lifetime of playing it safe. The two meet through Last Friend, an app that connects lonely Deckers (one of many ways in which Death-Cast influences social media). Mateo and Rufus set out to seize the day together in their final hours, during which their deepening friendship blossoms into something more. Present-tense chapters, short and time-stamped, primarily feature the protagonists’ distinctive first-person narrations. Fleeting third-person chapters give windows into the lives of other characters they encounter, underscoring how even a tiny action can change the course of someone else’s life. It’s another standout from Silvera (History Is All You Left Me, 2017, etc.), who here grapples gracefully with heavy questions about death and the meaning of a life well-lived.

Engrossing, contemplative, and as heart-wrenching as the title promises. (Speculative fiction. 13-adult).

Pub Date: Sept. 5, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-06-245779-0

Page Count: 384

Publisher: HarperTeen

Review Posted Online: June 5, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2017

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It's a rouser for all times.

THE MIDWIFE'S APPRENTICE

During the Middle Ages, an itinerant girl of about 12 or 13 who knows "no home and no mother and no name but Brat" finds refuge one night by burrowing into a village dung heap where the warm, rotting muck will protect her from the bitter cold.

In the morning she is taken in by a sharp-tongued woman who turns out to be Jane, the midwife. Brat is such a hard worker that before long she is accompanying Jane to birthings, where she cleans up after the work is done and acts as the midwife's "gofer" whenever necessary. Jane begins to trust her with some of the secrets of her trade, but when Brat is asked to help with a difficult birth and fails, she runs away ashamed not only of her lack of knowledge, but for her belief that she was ever worthy of learning. How Brat comes to terms with her failure and returns to Jane's home as a true apprentice is a gripping story about a time, place, and society that 20th-century readers can hardly fathom. Fortunately, Cushman (Catherine, Called Birdy, 1994) does the fathoming for them, rendering in Brat a character as fully fleshed and real as Katherine Paterson's best, in language that is simple, poetic, and funny. From the rebirth in the dung heap to Brat's renaming herself Alyce after a heady visit to a medieval fair, this is not for fans of historical drama only.

It's a rouser for all times. (Fiction. 12+)

Pub Date: March 27, 1995

ISBN: 978-0-395-69229-5

Page Count: 128

Publisher: Clarion Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 1995

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