KONGI AND POTGI by Oki S. Han

KONGI AND POTGI

by , illustrated by , adapted by
Age Range: 4 - 8

KIRKUS REVIEW

 There are several Korean variants of what most readers know as the story of Cinderella. In this one, Kongi is the lovely, uncomplaining, dutiful daughter and Potgi the hateful stepsister. The impossible tasks assigned to Kongi by her stepmother are performed for her by magical beings (a frog, a flock of sparrows, and a huge black ox); as in many of the European versions, and as Han and Plunkett (Sir Whong and the Golden Pig, 1993) note in a preface, these helpful creatures may represent the spirit of Kongi's dead mother. The familiar motif of the lost slipper is present here as well. This version ends happily for everyone: Potgi and her mother repent their cruelty to Kongi and are forgiven. As in Sir Whong, the watercolor illustrations are full of details depicting traditional Korean agrarian life and customs. Shirley Climo and Ruth Heller's The Korean Cinderella (1993) will probably remain the version of choice for sheer sumptuousness of color and design, but Han and Plunkett's is different enough to make it worth consideration for serious folklore collections. (Picture book/folklore. 4-8)

Pub Date: Nov. 1st, 1996
ISBN: 0-8037-1571-4
Page count: 32pp
Publisher: Dial
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15th, 1996




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