SOMETIMES WE WERE BRAVE

As the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan drag on, more families will face the difficult separation that comes with military service. While war isn’t explicitly mentioned here, the mom in the story is a sailor in the Navy and the impact of her absence is strongly felt. Narrated by her son, who appears to be early-elementary age, the focus is on the things that happen while she’s away. Jerome’s father does his best to soothe his fears and spend quality time with him. Jerome, meanwhile, tries to fulfill his mother’s request that he “be brave,” though his inner turmoil sometimes prompts bad behavior. Brisson’s lengthy text is straightforward and clearly intended to reassure young children in similar situations. Breaking the text into sections helps the flow while also making the passing of time apparent. Brassard’s watercolor illustrations are realistic with a varied perspective that adds interest. Faces are occasionally awkwardly proportioned, but Jerome’s dog Duffy is uniformly appealing, and his presence helps to lighten the overall mood. Earnest and effective. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-1-59078-586-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Boyds Mills

Review Posted Online: Dec. 27, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2010

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Sincere and wholehearted.

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I PROMISE

The NBA star offers a poem that encourages curiosity, integrity, compassion, courage, and self-forgiveness.

James makes his debut as a children’s author with a motivational poem touting life habits that children should strive for. In the first-person narration, he provides young readers with foundational self-esteem encouragement layered within basketball descriptions: “I promise to run full court and show up each time / to get right back up and let my magic shine.” While the verse is nothing particularly artful, it is heartfelt, and in her illustrations, Mata offers attention-grabbing illustrations of a diverse and enthusiastic group of children. Scenes vary, including classrooms hung with student artwork, an asphalt playground where kids jump double Dutch, and a gym populated with pint-sized basketball players, all clearly part of one bustling neighborhood. Her artistry brings black and brown joy to the forefront of each page. These children evince equal joy in learning and in play. One particularly touching double-page spread depicts two vignettes of a pair of black children, possibly siblings; in one, they cuddle comfortably together, and in the other, the older gives the younger a playful noogie. Adults will appreciate the closing checklist of promises, which emphasize active engagement with school. A closing note very generally introduces principles that underlie the Lebron James Family Foundation’s I Promise School (in Akron, Ohio). (This book was reviewed digitally with 10-by-20-inch double-page spreads viewed at 15% of actual size.)

Sincere and wholehearted. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Aug. 11, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-06-297106-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: June 16, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2020

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ROOM ON THE BROOM

Each time the witch loses something in the windy weather, she and her cat are introduced to a new friend who loves flying on her broom. The fluid rhyming and smooth rhythm work together with one repetitive plot element focusing young attention spans until the plot quickens. (“Is there room on the broom for a blank such as me?”) When the witch’s broom breaks, she is thrown in to danger and the plot flies to the finish. Her friends—cat, dog, frog, and bird—are not likely to scare the dragon who plans on eating the witch, but together they form a formidable, gooey, scary-sounding monster. The use of full-page or even page-and-a-half spreads for many of the illustrations will ensure its successful use in story times as well as individual readings. The wart-nosed witch and her passengers make magic that is sure to please. Effective use of brilliant colors set against well-conceived backgrounds detail the story without need for text—but with it, the story—and the broom—take off. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2001

ISBN: 0-8037-2557-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Dial Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2001

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