A Romani story to share and treasure.

YOKKI AND THE PARNO GRY

From the Travellers' Tales series

A boy’s dream gives his family hope.

Yokki and his family are Travelers, or Romani. They live in canvas tents, sell their handmade goods, and mend household objects when not working in the fields. Yokki has a special gift that is treasured; he tells “the best tales.” But one year, work is hard to find and money is scarce. Finally finding a place where they can rest, the family gathers around the fire and listens as Yokki tells a tale “from his dreams,” of a great horse called the Parno Gry. Still, things get worse for the Romani family as they are forced to sell almost all their possessions. Grandma, the Phuri Dai, agrees that a story about the horse will help lift their spirits. It is a tale of wonder, as the great white steed carries them all to a green land of plenty. And so the story remains with all the following generations, who “believe that as long as they value children’s imaginations, the Parno Gry will inspire them with new ideas and possibilities.” O’Neill, an honored Traveler storyteller from the British Isles, and Quarmby have collaborated on a gentle story of a different culture in which dreams inspire. Nelissen’s mixed-media illustrations are softly textured, colorful, and atmospheric.

A Romani story to share and treasure. (authors’ note, glossary) (Picture book. 5-8)

Pub Date: March 1, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-84643-927-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Child's Play

Review Posted Online: Dec. 6, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2016

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THE GIRL WHO LOVED WILD HORSES

            There are many parallel legends – the seal women, for example, with their strange sad longings – but none is more direct than this American Indian story of a girl who is carried away in a horses’ stampede…to ride thenceforth by the side of a beautiful stallion who leads the wild horses.  The girl had always loved horses, and seemed to understand them “in a special way”; a year after her disappearance her people find her riding beside the stallion, calf in tow, and take her home despite his strong resistance.  But she is unhappy and returns to the stallion; after that, a beautiful mare is seen riding always beside him.  Goble tells the story soberly, allowing it to settle, to find its own level.  The illustrations are in the familiar striking Goble style, but softened out here and there with masses of flowers and foliage – suitable perhaps for the switch in subject matter from war to love, but we miss the spanking clean design of Custer’s Last Battle and The Fetterman Fight.          6-7

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 1978

ISBN: 0689845049

Page Count: -

Publisher: Bradbury

Review Posted Online: April 26, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1978

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This story covers the few days preceding the much-anticipated Midnight Zombie Walk, when Stink and company will take to the...

STINK AND THE MIDNIGHT ZOMBIE WALK

From the Stink series

An all-zombie-all-the-time zombiefest, featuring a bunch of grade-school kids, including protagonist Stink and his happy comrades.

This story covers the few days preceding the much-anticipated Midnight Zombie Walk, when Stink and company will take to the streets in the time-honored stiff-armed, stiff-legged fashion. McDonald signals her intent on page one: “Stink and Webster were playing Attack of the Knitting Needle Zombies when Fred Zombie’s eye fell off and rolled across the floor.” The farce is as broad as the Atlantic, with enough spookiness just below the surface to provide the all-important shivers. Accompanied by Reynolds’ drawings—dozens of scene-setting gems with good, creepy living dead—McDonald shapes chapters around zombie motifs: making zombie costumes, eating zombie fare at school, reading zombie books each other to reach the one-million-minutes-of-reading challenge. When the zombie walk happens, it delivers solid zombie awfulness. McDonald’s feel-good tone is deeply encouraging for readers to get up and do this for themselves because it looks like so much darned fun, while the sub-message—that reading grows “strong hearts and minds,” as well as teeth and bones—is enough of a vital interest to the story line to be taken at face value.

Pub Date: March 13, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-7636-5692-8

Page Count: 160

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: Dec. 14, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2012

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