TAMING A SEAHORSE by Robert B. Parker

TAMING A SEAHORSE

Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

In this thin sequel to Ceremony (1982), tough/noble Spenser again sets out to save (more or less) teen prostitute April Kyle--now working in Manhattan, where she has foolishly left the classy brothel run by Patricia Utley (Spenser's chum) in order to turn call-girl tricks for a sleek black pimp named Robert Rambeaux. Spenser talks to April briefly; she declares her love for Rambeaux. But then April disappears, Rambeaux is found murdered--and so is Ginger, a hooker who supplied Spenser with information on Rambeaux. Where is April? Who killed Rambeaux and Ginger? To find out, Spenser traces Ginger's prostitution career--from sexual abuse in home-town Maine to a Portland message parlor to Boston's "Crown Prince Club," an upscale macho sex-emporium with links to the Mob and a lecherous bank president. And the limp, predictable plot leads to Spenser (assisted by Hawk) making a deal with the powerful bad guys in order to rescue April. Despite more than a few good one-liners, the Spenser of the 1980's continues to be a smug, self-righteous narcissist (as preoccupied with his outfits as any pimp), and not much fun. The hoary sentimentality about prostitution is slathered on extra thick. But, with Parker's easy-read style and a bit less pretentiousness than some recent Spensers, this should do well commercially--thanks largely to heavy promotion, the TV tie-in, and the crest of Parker popularity that has coincided so ironically with his descent from genre artist to self-indulgent hack.
Pub Date: June 6th, 1986
ISBN: 0440188415
Page count: 324pp
Publisher: Delacorte
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15th, 1986




MORE BY ROBERT B. PARKER

MysterySILENT NIGHT by Robert B. Parker
by Robert B. Parker
MysteryROBERT B. PARKER'S IRONHORSE by Robert B. Parker
by Robert B. Parker
FictionSIXKILL by Robert B. Parker
by Robert B. Parker
MysteryPAINTED LADIES by Robert B. Parker
by Robert B. Parker

SIMILAR BOOKS SUGGESTED BY OUR CRITICS:

IndieHeartbreaker by Thomas Duffy
by Thomas Duffy