THE GROWING STORY

Despite his mother’s repeated reassurances, a tyke who observes changes in chicks and a puppy as seasons pass has trouble believing that he’s growing too. The text, originally published in 1947, hasn’t aged, but Oxenbury’s fresh take on the antique rural setting and stylized figures of Phyllis Rowand’s illustrations does add a livelier, more natural look. Though there’s an odd distance in the pictures between the pensive little boy and his hardworking, very young-looking single parent—the two seldom make eye contact, she is usually posed at least partially turned away from the viewer and her preoccupied reply to his persistent query (“Of course you are growing”) seems snappish—the boy’s doubt is one that might occur to many younger children. When the previous winter’s clothing proves too small, thus providing objective proof that he is indeed getting bigger, his exuberant cartwheel ends the episode on an emphatic, upbeat note. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: June 1, 2007

ISBN: 978-0-06-024716-4

Page Count: 40

Publisher: HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2007

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DRY DAYS, WET NIGHTS

Now that he stays dry all day, Little Bunny wants to leave his diaper off at night. ``I'm not a baby,'' declares ``LB,'' and Mama, agreeing, adds, ``We can see what happens tonight. If your body is ready, then you'll stay dry.'' Still, LB wakes up ``cold, wet, and confused'' in the middle of a dream. Cheerfully, Mama changes his sheets, helps again the next night when he makes it almost to the bathroom, and comforts the discouraged bunny as months pass and he learns to ride a bike and outgrows two pairs of shoes. Dad helps too, by remembering that ``when I was about your age, I used to wet the bed.'' Finally, LB wakes up dry; and while Mama suggests a celebration she also wisely observes that they should ``take one day at a time.'' Sensible, exemplary, and nicely extended in appealingly expressive illustrations; ``A Note for Parents'' adds specifics about the prevalance of normal bed- wetting among preschoolers to the story's implicit advice for dealing with it. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: March 1, 1994

ISBN: 0-8075-1723-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Whitman

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1994

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Will doubtless leave young readers and viewers flushed with excitement.

THE DINOSAUR THAT POOPED THE PAST!

From the Dinosaur That… series

Fresh (if that’s the word) from excretory adventures in outer space (see The Dinosaur That Pooped a Planet, 2017), Danny and his craptastic dino companion undertake further effluvial exploits in the Jurassic.

Having discovered that the swing in Granny’s yard is a time machine, the white boy and the dino find themselves in deep soup when it breaks—stranding them in the distant past right next to an erupting volcano. With help from a trio of mischievous tykes dubbed “Dino Dudes A, B, and C,” the very images of pop-eyed, primary-colored cuteness in the cartoon illustrations, repairs are made…but how to get the required push? Having previously chowed down on Granny’s broccoli eggs and Brussels sprouts, it’s time for Dinosaur to do his thing: “The poop came out fast; it had broccoli power, / And launched them to eighty-eight miles per hour.” Back through the eras they fly (“The Romans and Trojans were covered in poop; / They all got a taste of Gran’s broccoli soup”), with the Dudes tagging along, to arrive back at Gran’s just in time for slices of, yes, broccoli cake. Parsons renders the prehistoric lava with an evocatively red and glutinous look, and if the gusher that flows out of Dinosaur’s butt is counterintuitively orange, it’s still a revolting sight. That the rhyme seems often to be in thrall to tortured scansion is probably a minor consideration.

Will doubtless leave young readers and viewers flushed with excitement. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: March 13, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-4814-9868-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Aladdin

Review Posted Online: Nov. 22, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2017

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